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For Victoria Bax Eventing it’s Sunshine and Smiles

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For Victoria Bax Eventing it’s sunshine and smiles. June kicked off rather well. Crystal Ka and I headed off to Little Downham for the Open Novice class. We produced a nice, polite dressage and the most beautiful double clear, sadly 9 seconds cost us the win, so we finished a creditable 5th. I was thrilled with our performance as both of us were absolutely on form. I was very surprised that I did incur the 9 seconds worth of time penalties because as far as I knew I didn’t take a pull the entire way round (we meant business!) It really does give you a boost for the old confidence when everything goes right on the day as it’s not that often that it does actually happen!

The following week I held my 5th cross country schooling clinic of the year. This time it was held at a super venue called Lodge Farm in Matfield, Kent. This is somewhere I first visited towards the end of last year and found it to be an educational venue. I don’t know of anywhere else that has that amount of combinations set up as Lodge Farm does. It also has a beautiful new water complex with lots of different in and out options. None of my clients attending had ever been to Lodge Farm before, but by the end of their sessions, they were all beaming with pride at their achievements. Sadly my main achievement for the day was to get pretty sunburnt as I didn’t have time to get back to my car to reapply the sunblock (epic fail!).

The following weekend saw scorching temperatures and burning sunshine as we headed off to Stratford Hills. My most local event, Crystal Ka produced a fair dressage although it seems the judge wasn’t feeling the love for everyone’s efforts on that day as none of them had particularly amazing scores. Still, as long as everyone is scored in the same way it still makes the competition fair. Another clear show jump round followed, but by then I had already made my decision that due to the scorching temperatures, in the 30’s and the no real need to run cross country, I withdrew and took my lovely boy home to cool off.
Crystal Ka is my horse of a lifetime and at 15 years old, although that is not overly old, he is an ex-racehorse having completed 23 races by the time he was 4 years old and being my main event horse for the last 10 years so there really was no real benefit in running him in that kind of weather. He means a huge amount to me, much more than just giving me the adrenaline rush of going cross country. As he in no longer running at Intermediate level and is out of Novice points, he can not qualify for anything so there really was no need to put him through that and I would never have forgiven myself if something awful had happened due to the weather. I only wish a few more people thought the same as there were plenty of tired horses out there on that course that I saw while walking my track.

My year is starting to take a turn for the better as more good news has just been received:My one and only, 6-year-old Alberta’s Pride aka Frankie who was very sadly diagnosed with a suspensory ligament injury to his right hind back in January of this year but has now been given the all clear from the vet. It all started in January, following a few months of back issues occurring (too many times in too short a period of time) so I decided there must be something else underlying causing these issues. This was confirmed by a lameness workout, and his right hind suspensory was found to have been enlarged to 21.5mm (his left hind was normal at just 13.5mm). Fortunately, there were no lesions or holes, so the vet was confident it was due to a trauma rather than conformational or other reasons. However, there was always doubt as to whether it would repair itself suitably again. As you know I am a fan of the Arc Equine technology which I have used for a few years now on both horse and human and so in conjunction with the Arc technology and feeding Aloeride we followed our rehabilitation programme to the detail.

The result is that in just five months, in fact, 10 weeks actually as the scan showed the reduction of the suspensory ligament right back down to the same size as the uninjured one. However, the fibres at that time looked good but needed to look thicker and stronger. So the final scan just another ten weeks later showed even more of an improvement to the point where the vet advised that she didn’t think they would look any better given even more time. So, as he was sound and had been back into a good amount of ridden work, i.e. Cantering so she was happy to sign him off.

However, this is not to say he will be going eventing anytime soon. I will, however, continue to increase the load on the suspensory ligament through increased and varied types of work to hopefully ensure the improvement keeps happening so at some point in the not too distant future this little horse who I think an enormous amount of will one day get back out eventing and aiming at fulfilling our dreams.

Please do all keep your fingers and toes crossed that he continues with his improvement!

Also, great news for my grey, Alberta’s Rose who sadly had a fall in the water at her last event has been given the all clear by the vet to get back to work and competition. I was concerned about some swelling that was still viable on one front leg, so decided to get it checked out. Thankfully the vet found no damage to the inside of the leg at all. The only clue which became visible as the leg was clipped ready for scanning was a graze on the side of her cannon bone that couldn’t be felt through the leg hair. She must have really whacked that when she went down and it appears that could be what is responsible for the swelling. With this news, I have had her right back in work, entered her next event and been back out on the cross country course to check that she has not lost any confidence when it comes to water or anything else for that matter. Thankfully she was as keen as ever and thoroughly enjoyed herself.
This means we head off to Brightling Park at the weekend, so until next time…

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FIREWORKS AND EXPLOSIVES

Fireworks and explosives
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The month of November might feature fireworks and explosives but that doesn’t mean, as the winter rolls in, that we want to find them under our saddle! Here are our 6 top tips for managing fresh horses

  • If you are feeling the cold, the likelihood is that your horse is too, so get moving as soon as you can.
  • Quarter sheets are great but in windy weather can end up blowing all over the place (Not a great idea on a spooky horse!)
  • Keep your horse’s mind focused on you by incorporating new exercises into your schooling and give plenty of variety.
  • If your horse is looking rather bright in the stable when you turn up to ride, then work him on the ground before you hop on.
  • Don’t take risks with a fresh horse, wearing a hard hat and gloves when leading or handling a horse could save your life.
  • Feed your horse accordingly so that you don’t end up over feeding which could increase the risk of tying up and also add to silly behaviour. Aloeride helps support a healthy digestive system and gut, which in turn can make a meaningful change in mood, cognition and ultimately behaviour. This also means that your horse is more receptive to training and is more likely to be calm during performance.
  • And to help you keep calm about your horse’s health and wellbeing all year, take advantage of our money saving offer here:

N.B: This advice is general and we would always recommend that you professional expert advice on managing your horse.

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Try reverse to make your horse go forward…

Aloeride aloe vera steamed soaked rolled oats
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A very dear friend of mine used to keep me on my toes with quotes like “il faut reculer pour mieux sauter”. Literally this means that one must draw back in order to make a better jump. Figuratively it could mean that you go back to older ways to get better results. Try reverse to make your horse go forward… be surprised at how much there is to gain.

Walk into your feed merchant and marvel at the vast array of horse feeds available. Imagine what was available to your grandparents and great-grandparents. Ask yourself if any of this proliferation has resulted in fewer gastric ulcerations/year, in fewer colics/year, in fewer cases of laminitis/year, in higher speeds at the racecourse, in higher jumps at showjumping… Galloping along in our busy lives, we assume that new is better, that ‘researched’ new is better still. But who is the winner? Is it your horse, is it you or is it follow the money, that catchphrase popularized by the 1976 drama-documentary motion picture All The President’s Men. Sure, you’re a winner in as much that scoops of feed save you time… If horses were the winner, the Royal Veterinary College of Surgeons statistics would show that interventions/year decreased because feed is getting smarter at preventing stuff.  That’s not the case.

You

Walk into your supermarket and marvel at the vast array of foods available… again, spoilt for choice and being advertised to, to an inch of your life. When you are not doing well on modern food and present with symptoms, consider reverting back to a simpler diet like a Paleolithic diet. You limit foods that became common when farming emerged about 10,000 years ago i.e. dairy products, grains (wheat, oats, barley), refined sugar, table salt, potatoes and legumes (beans, lentils, peanuts, peas). You include lean grass-fed meat or wild game, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and oils from fruit and nuts (olive oil or walnut oil). It may be a nightmare diet for vegetarians or vegans but, for health-challenged omnivores, a test period of simplifying food intake can reveal huge benefits. It is a sustainable diet providing the emphasis is not on the meat/fish quantity and, for better results still, add the clever smoothies that we advocate. When you are not doing well on modern food and present with symptoms, you also have the luxury of choice to do or not do Intermittent Fasting. Not so for your horse because its continuous gastric secretion prohibits any fasting.

Your Horse

When your horse is not doing well on modern feed, revert back to oats (Avena sativa). Simplify your horse’s diet by abandoning compound, cooked feeds. It is safe to do so, two generations ago this was the norm. Manufacturers of compound feeds unfairly associated oats with excessive excitability, equine rhabdomyolysis syndrome (ERS), colic and laminitis. Such criticism ignores that traditionally oats were fed alongside good quality hay, haylage, grass or alfalfa. Given the array of calmers sold annually, it is a fair observation that compound feeds do not prevent horses going fizzy… nor do compound feeds prevent experiencing colic, nor do compound feeds prevent developing laminitis. As my dear friend would say “plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” (the more it changes, the more it’s the same thing). Oats have the highest fibre content and lowest energy of all the grains. Their grains are easy to chew properly thus mixing with saliva well. Sure, compared to compound cooked feeds, the shelf life of oats is not ideal when galloping along in our busy lives (we know, looking after horses is hard work) but, is not your horse worth a trial?

Digestive issues

I wrote this article because at Aloeride we receive many questions about horses that struggle with their digestion. During such calls we may discuss the timeline i.e. symptoms, intervention, response, change of feed, supplements and so on. Often one compound feed was swapped for another to little avail. Imagine feed-sensitivity and trigger A being in feed 1 and trigger B being in feed 2. Swapping from feed 1 to 2 would make no apparent difference to your horse. Desensitisation (Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy) is costly and not always successful. Hence the advice ‘Try reverse to make your horse go forward’, take diet back to basics and observe. If there is a clear improvement, then you have it confirmed on a shoestring that there is a food trigger. Then a choice is to be made in respect of future feed and – like in human food sensitivity – adding Aloeride provides a very useful digestive support via a wide range of nutrients.

Oat Couture

Pure oats are considered safe for those with gluten intolerance, a surprising angle perhaps until you hear vets talk about horses with IBS. Raw, whole oats have a 2.3-8.5% beta-glucan content which reduces the risk of Obesity and type 2 Diabetes. Both horses and people can get Insulin Resistance, but horses do not go to the next step of Diabetes 2. As you know, horses do have total carbohydrate load issues (hence low cal, low GI, laminitic and super cool feeds). Beta-glucan increases the excretion of bile acids (good detox) and binds with cholesterol-rich bile acids. Normally, bile acids are re-absorbed in the digestive system, but beta-glucan inhibits this recycling process thereby seeing bad cholesterol (LDL) out of the horse. Beta-glucan also causes a reduction in blood sugar and insulin levels after a carbohydrate-rich meal (thus less spiking). The major protein in oats is called Avenalin (80%) – not found in any other grain – which is similar to legume proteins, a minor protein (i.e. not much of it) is called Avenin which is related to gluten in wheat. Raw oats are the only dietary source of powerful antioxidants called Avenathramides and these have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-itch, anti-irritant, and anti-atherogenic activities. Raw oats are high in many vitamins and minerals: Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Copper, Zinc, Iron, Selenium, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin E (total tocols ranged from 19 to 30.3 mg/kg; α-tocotrienol & α-tocopherols combined account for 86 to 91%). In human patients with type 2 Diabetes and severe Insulin Resistance, a 4-week dietary intervention with oatmeal resulted in a 40% reduction in the insulin dosage needed for stabilizing blood sugar levels. When your horse is not doing well on modern feed, why not do a raw oats trial with your horse for 4 weeks with a gradual entry into a (soaked) oats + good quality hay/haylage, grass or alfalfa diet. You may discover that this is one of the ‘old ways’ that may have the edge over ‘new ways’.

Feed values of oats and dehulled oatsIn a transition from modern feeds to one of oats (with grazing/hay or haylage/Aloeride), you need to remember that scoops give volume i.e. measure litres or quarts. An equine stomach is relatively small – made for ongoing grazing with small amounts going in as small amounts pass to the duodenum – so supplemental meal size should be limited to no more than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) for an 1,100 lbs (500 kg) horse. A horse assumedly going hot on oats may happen for no simpler reason that the scoop feeds more oats than the feedroom scale would issue. As a reasonable starch intake per meal is 1g per 1kg of live weight, a 500g horse should get 0.5kg of starch per meal which equates to 1.1kg of oats (calculating on starch content being some 460g/kg DM = 46% x 1.1kg = 0.5kg of starch). Feeding should mirror workload and not all oats have the same nutritional value. So, as always, observe how your horse responds.

By weight, raw oats are 66% carbohydrates, 17% protein, 7% fat (unsaturated fatty acids) and 11% fiber. Oats contain more soluble fiber than other grains, leading to slower digestion, increased satiety and suppression of appetite. Oats are very low in sugar, with only 1% coming from sucrose. The starches in oats are different than those in other grains, it has a higher fat content and higher viscosity (it binds water better):

  • Rapidly digested starch (7%) which is quickly broken down and absorbed as glucose
  • Slowly digested starch (22%) that is broken down and absorbed more slowly
  • Resistant starch (25%) which functions like a type of fiber. It escapes digestion and improves gut health by feeding the friendly gut bacteria i.e. prebiotic

 

Many compound feeds contain wheat, barley and/or rye, all three contain gluten. When your horse is not doing well on modern feed it may well be reactive akin to non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. Rather than swap one compound feed for another compound feed via the trial and error method, why don’t you eliminate triggers by feeding your horse the traditional single feed. Take note of the following:

“Gluten may not be the culprit when it comes to wheat sensitivities, according to a new body of research presented at the United European Gastroenterology Week 2016. Instead, a team of scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany discovered a different protein in wheat known as amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) may be what triggers the stomach-sickening inflammation and other symptoms.”

“For the study, the team stopped focusing on gluten — a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye — and shifted their attention to ATIs because it appears to cause inflammation and worsen other chronic health conditions. Although ATIs only make up 4 percent of proteins found in wheat, they are responsible for a lot of damage throughout the body. Not only is the stomach at risk for dangerous inflammation, but so are the lymph nodes, kidneys, spleen, and brain as well. ATIs may also contribute to the development of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.”

To soak or not to soak

Soak whole oats in cold water for approximately 12 hours. A benefit is that dust will be and chemical residue from sprays may be washed away. It may make oats softer but frankly, the huge molars of a horse will masticate unsoaked whole oats perfectly fine (toothless veterans being the exception). During the transition period you may noticed a few oats in your horse’ droppings, but only for about a week.

“If 9kg oats and 3.5kg hay are fed then the likely fat intakes will be between 490 and 525 g/day, up to 1.5x that consumed from forage alone (312 to 437 g/day from 12.5kg dry material say grass hay). If naked (hull-less) oats are substituted for traditional oats then the fat intake from the basic ration would nearly be 1 kg/day. Thus, horses fed conventional diets can consume between half and one kilo of plant fat per day, all of it unsaturated! It is clear that the horse is well adapted to dietary fat when it is a component of plant material.” Dr. Derek Cuddeford (RIP), Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh

Does soaking make oats a ‘living enzyme’

Most of the metabolically active proteins, mostly enzymes, in oats are in the water-soluble albumin fraction. Among the enzymes, presence of proteases, maltase, a-amylase, lichenase, phenoxyacetic acid hydroxylase, phosphatase, tyrosinase, and lipases have been reported (Osborne classification). Some suggest that oats during soaking start to self-digest and, having been ‘pre-digested’ overnight, require fewer digestive enzyme resources from a horse. Well, if you sprinkle an enzyme complex (amylase, protease, lipase) on porridge you will see its consistency change within 15 minutes… porridge goes fluidy/slimy. The surface of oats does not appear surface slimy by overnight self-digestion (i.e. it is softer because of being wetted only). If you must soak oats then drain them overnight or for a good hour prior to feeding. BTW the water in the soaking bin will contain some of the inorganic minerals from the oats. Why soak if not absolutely necessary?!? In light work feed approximately 2lbs – 3lbs of oats twice a day with alfalfa and good hay. In hard work e.g. eventing or racing feed approximately 6lbs – 7lbs of oats twice a day with alfalfa and good hay. As always with any feed, observe how your horse responds.

Scientific information on oats: Journal Food Science Technology.

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Loraine Homer feeds Aloeride

Loraine Homer feeds Aloeride aloe vera
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Loraine Homer feeds Aloeride to all her horses because it works. It works for her show horses but also for the horses that she brings on for sale. Why spend a fortune on coat shine this season, when your horse or pony can have radiance that comes from within? Aloeride not only helps promote a shiny coat, it also helps promote healthy skin, assists hoof quality and help maintain a healthy immune and digestive system – all in one easy to feed taste-free daily sachet. Loraine Homer feeds Aloeride to all her horses that she competes with or that she brings on for sale.

“Since feeding Aloeride, my horses now have a wonderful, natural bloom to their coats: An essential ingredient for that winning appearance!”

Loraine is the winner of The 2011 HOYS Ladies Hunter Championship, show rider, judge and top show horse producer. Loraine was born into a very horsey family, her mother Barbara Ashby-Jones was a top side-saddle rider, while her father David Tatlow is a renowned showman and a former point-to-point champion. As a child Loraine was keen on hunting, and became involved in showing through a working hunter pony called Cuckoo. After leaving school she set up as a show producer, working alongside her father at his yard in Oxfordshire. Loraine specialises in producing top class show hunters, with all of their horses coming over from Ireland as youngsters. She has won titles at all of the major shows, and in 2011 she was hunter champion at the Royal International with Major Moylam. She also won her first HOYS title in the ladies’ hunter class with Jonas O’Shannon.

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HORSES WITH HO HO!

Aloeride aloe vera Christmas
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Aloeride Facebook OfferYes, all us horse owners can feel a bit ‘humbug’ at this time of year, but with a bit of pre Christmas day planning and some clever thinking you can get some time to enjoy Christmas ‘like normal people’! Use the coupon code we posted on the Aloeride facebook page in our shopping cart – click the image to give your horse 4 cartons for the price of 3. Here are our 5 Horses With Ho Ho! top tips…

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farWork out a yard rota that means you all have a share of the jobs on the day. Most people will try and visit their beloved equine on Christmas day if they can, so work out whether they could help do lunchtime feeds, hay-up and top water buckets or skip out etc. Many hands make light work!

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farDeep littering can save time over the Christmas period, allowing you to just skip out as opposed to a thorough mucking out job when everyone is opening their presents and having fun.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farMake up your feeds all at once for the week in rodent proof containers with lids and clearly labelled with your horse’s name and time of feed. Our supplement comes in handy air tight sachets that can sit on top of your dry feed meal ready for sachet sprinkling over his food for much added goodness.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farKeep an eye on the weather forecast so that you are prepared with the right rugs ready to hand and a plan in place of what to do in the event of snow, rain or high winds.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farIf you do have to work at the yard on Christmas day, get the radio on with some classic Christmas gold, your best Christmas jumper on and armed with a mince pie and a hot cuppa get jolly as you get going!

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Victoria Bax Eventing blog December 2017

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What’s up in the Victoria Bax Eventing blog December 2017… well, November was another month of huge ups and downs. It started very well with a trip out to our new local British Showjumping show at the lovely Beechwood Ec early this month. I had initially planned to take two horses, but one did what they do best and came in a couple of nights before with a cut and a fat leg which is still not better three days later, so she managed to swerve a showjumping trip! However, six-year-old Alberta’s Pride (aka Frankie) went alone and excelled himself yet again by not only producing another double clear in the British Novice but also a super duper double clear in his first Discovery too; is there no end to this boy’s talent.

The following week, Alberta’s Pride was called up to fill a place in a Riding Club Team qualifier where he put in another superb jumping display in the 1m & 1.05m rounds helping the team finish a respectable 2nd.

Some successful clinics have now been completed as after all it is prime training season right now. The course showjumping clinic was lots of fun with a couple of new clients and lots of regulars, all thoroughly enjoying themselves, practising techniques and learning new skills, but two sessions really stood out for me;

One very brave regular of mine brought along her new horse and smashed it by jumping around the whole course! Brilliant! Another who has travelled a very LONG journey over the last eight months with her own horse, who at the start would not even step over a pole on the ground through to jumping beautifully round the course including all the fillers; making it look very easy.

Lastly, later this month I received some utterly devastating news from a phone call late on Friday afternoon to let me know that a lady who started as a regular client but soon turned in a great friend very sadly lost her extremely quick and aggressive fight against cancer and passed away. She learnt of her diagnosis only 4/6 weeks beforehand and simply didn’t have a chance of fighting it as it had really got a hold of her. I am utterly devastated to lose someone who I considered a really good friend. My thoughts go out to her young family and husband at this hugely tragic time. So, please give your loved ones both two-legged, and four-legged an extra hug and kiss today because you never know when it might be their last.

Life does go on for the rest of us, so wishing everyone a happy Christmas and a smashingly successful New Year.

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THE HARD TRUTH

The hard truth hooves hard ground
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We all know that baked hard ground is the result of great summer weather, but when it comes to looking after your horse’s legs, you need to take extra care, so here are our top 5 tips for perfect pins!

  • It should be obvious but if the ground is hard then don’t ‘run’ your horse. There is always another competition, another day but not new legs!
  • If your horse is the type to take a good gallop around the field on turning out, try riding or lunging him before in the school to take the edge off and save his legs.
  • Looking after your horse’s feet is particularly important, and regular shoeing is essential. Your farrier may suggest remedial shoeing or padding if your horse really suffers from the hard ground.
  • Nutritional support can also help promote strong and healthy hooves, and Aloeride is your all round easy to feed taste free supplement that helps promote healthy hoof growth.
  • Check your horse’s legs daily so that you notice any new lumps, bumps, heat or swellings and pick his feet out regularly. They might not be full of mud, but stones can still be lodged in the frog or manure which when compacted won’t promote a healthy environment in the foot, causing more problems.


N.B: This advice is general and we would always recommend that you seek your own vet’s advice concerning your horses’ wellbeing and management.

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SUMMER SIZZLERS!

Aloeride aloe vera cooling horse, summer sizzlers!
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Keeping your horse hydrated and cool as temperatures rise over the summer months can prove to be a challenge; especially as busy competition schedules can mean a longer to wait in-between classes or championships at the end of a long and hot day. Here are 8 top tips for keeping your horse hydrated and happy this summer…

  • Try wetting your horse’s hay to help him get further moisture uptake.
  • Some horses can be particular about taking water from a different source, so if possible travel your horse with water from home. If you are staying away at a show then try adding an apple cordial to your horse’s water to encourage him to drink.
  • Never load your horse straight after your class, allow him to cool down, take some fluids and relax, before loading him up to travel home.
  • Try and park the lorry in some shade and if there is none then keep your horse inside the lorry with the ramp down so he has some shade without being directly under the beating sun.
  • If it’s really hot, try and keep your warm-up to the minimum, remember with the heat your horses’ muscles will get warmer quicker anyway, but if your horse is quite fresh and needs working in properly, then try and ride him earlier in the morning, so that the warm-up just before your class doesn’t have to be as extensive.
  • Including salt and electrolytes are key because your horse needs electrolytes to rehydrate effectively and salt plays a key role in ensuring your horse receives sufficient sodium chloride.
  • Equi-N-IcE Rapid Cooler RugIt is of paramount importance that horses can drink ad libitum. Drinking water means that water gets inside, but how long your horse stays hydrated is influenced in part by the presence of electrolytes. This is yet another reason why micronutrient loaded horses love Aloeride.
  • There are a lot of cooling products on the market, created to help keep your horse cool during the hot weather. We love the Equi-N-IcE Rapid Cooler Rug, which you simply activate by popping the rug in a bucket of their coolant for a fresh rejuvinating cooling effect! This unique cooler actually draws the heat away from the muscles by rapid evaporation to drop the temperature of the horse as quickly as possible to reduce thermal strain. You can win this fantastic rug along with 1 month supply of Aloeride by heading over to our Facebook page!


N.B: This advice is general and we would always recommend that you seek your own vet’s advice concerning your horses’ wellbeing and management.

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ON THE ROAD!

Travelling Your Horse In Safety
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Travelling your horse can take a lot out of your horse so being prepared for life on the road is key. We asked top professional show judge, producer and rider and Aloeride sponsored rider Loraine Homer for her top tips for travel happy this summer…

  • If you are planning a long journey in the lorry and your horse is not used to travelling, then take him out for a few short trips leading up the day, otherwise you might find he won’t be so willing to make the return journey!
  • Try and travel early in the morning or later in the evenings, when traffic is lighter and the temperature has cooled.
  • If travelling on a long journey, stop to give your horse fresh water drinks at various points along the way, especially if it is a hot summer’s day. If your horse is a reluctant drinker, bring your own water supply for the day and add apple flavouring to encourage drinking.
  • Travelling can take a lot out of your horse, so make sure you take into account his diet and nutritional support. We feed Aloeride because it not only keeps them looking and feeling great during a busy season but supports a healthy gut function, which is imperative for any competition horse.
  • Good ventilation is key in a lorry, so make sure air vents and windows are open so there is good air circulation in the horse compartment.
  • Make sure you know where you going! Sounds simple but check your route for height, weight and width restrictions before setting your sat nav.
  • Allow for delays so that even if you are a little late you still have time to prepare for your horse and yourself.
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Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage

Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage
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Use your £40 Coupon Code


After you add the above 4-cartons in the shopping Basket, apply your Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage coupon code in the Cart. This immediately gives you the £40 discount. Simply put, the Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage helps you to 48 LITRES of aloe vera barbadensis miller for £220.80 – £40.00 = £180.80. Divide this by 48 = £3.77 per litre. But that’s impossible for aloe vera barbadensis miller that contains up to 23.4 times more nutrients you might say. Yup it pretty much is, yet we do it anyway. Because we want your horse to benefit from the proven best in aloe vera. Order goods value > £100 enjoy freepost. Because you are a member of Horse Quest Advantage, you can bag yourself an extraordinary bargain!

Soil Association Certified Organic Aloeride aloe veraThe Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage gives you the most amazing opportunity to bag a bargain on highly valuable aloe vera for horses. Save yourself £40 on 120 DAYS – and each of these 120 sachets is a whopping 400ml juice equivalent – of exemplary and palatable aloe vera. Aloeride aloe vera for horses probably is the most versatile horse feed supplement on the market. It supports digestion whilst at the same time it supports hoof health, condition blossoms and movement palpably eases, natural coat shine simply becomes amazing and with that the natural resilience of skin and coat protects against beasties and the weather, and often behaviour improves when a horse feels more comfortable.

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Digestive Health Support

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Hoof Health, Hoof Strength

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Coat Health and Natural Coat Shine

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The Problem Of Sweet Itch

The problem of sweet itch is that two horses in the same field can respond differently to the same culicoides midges pestering them. This is at the same time your...

Between your feed mix and grazing and Aloeride’s unique nutrient servings and a greater uptake of all these nutrients, your horses are able to stay much healthier and perform better for longer.

Your horse is worth you knowing what’s behind a label

For an objective view on proven premium quality, unadulterated product samples of Aloeride, Aloequine, Barrier Animal Healthcare Pure Aloe Vera Juice, Forever Living Stabilised Aloe Vera Gel and Hilton Herbs Aloe Vera were presented for independent measurement by an accredited laboratory equipped for industry standard evaluation of aloe vera. The results may astound you:

Aloeride Product 2a Product 3b Product 4f Product 5h
48 litres optimised to 120 palatable powder sachets per carton 48 litres = 3.17 x (3.785 litres @ £35.00) 48 litres = 2.4 x (5 litres @ £37.76) 48 litres = 12 x (1 litre @ £21.62) 48 litres = 2.4 x (5 litres @ £63.00)
£180.80 thanks to your coupon code £443.80 £362.52 £1,037.76 £604.80
Nutritional Density: 5.31 x fewer nutrients 23.4 x fewer nutrients 3.23 x fewer nutrients 2.39 x fewer nutrients
4,680 mg/L 880 mg/L 200 mg/L 1,450 mg/L 1,960 mg/L
£3.77 per litre £9.25 per litre £7.55 per litre £21.62 per litre £12.60 per litre
We can supply you with a multi-laboratory proven better aloe vera at vastly deflated cost because we don’t have expensive offices, we don’t finance a multilevel marketing pyramid, we don’t have much staff, we don’t transport liquid aloe, and we don’t seek rapacious profit.

Top equestrians use Aloeride

Horse Quest Advantage get the advantage aloe veraAloeride is used by top rider and breeders like Loraine Homer, Katie Jerram and Jo Bates (Showing), Leah Bennett (Dressage), Victoria Bax and Eliza Stoddart (Eventing), Sally Toye, Heather Watson, Suzanne Taylor (Endurance). Stud Farms and Racing Yards also feed Aloeride. They all love what Aloeride does for their horses and our guess is, so will you. Aloeride 100% complies with Consultant Gastroenterologist Dr. Danhof MD PhD’s definition of the best aloe (he is universally recognised as the world’s foremost expert on aloe vera). Each carton gives your horse 30 days of outstanding nutritional support. Thus the Aloeride Offer for Horse Quest Advantage gives gives your horse 120 palatable servings of 2,000mg (400mL equivalent original organic aloe vera juice) containing a proven greater quantity and better quality of working molecules than you would get even from well-known aloe vera gel or juice. Every batch of Aloeride goes through a number of tests relevant to competitors including NOPS at LGC in Newmarket.

Aloeride provides more than unique digestive support to help gastric issues associated with racehorses. Between digestive succour and the unique nutrients (over and beyond feed) that Aloeride provides, your racehorses are more likely to achieve and maintain optimal condition. Increased and expertly trained lean muscle mass needs strong healthy hooves to translate power & stamina into traction, pace and winnings. Farriers familiar with Aloeride know that it works brilliantly. Beyond your expert training and what’s in a horse’s head, limiting performance factors are lactic acid metabolism and innate control of soft tissue micro-inflammation. Optimum nutrition can be a fantastic help with this, providing you feed your horses the right nutrients. After the race there is recovery time which length depends on how well nutrients promote tissue repair and cooling tissue down. Between its unique spectrum of nutrients, its proven superiority compared to other aloe products, its generous dosage, its sensible contribution to equine health, many Trainers quietly added Aloeride to their game…

We believe that the above is a matter of public interest and constitutes fair comment without malice. We believe that empowering people to make an informed choice is good. All measurements within our website are factual and are quoted verbatim from the reports we receive from accredited, independent laboratories and we retain such supporting evidence to justify that the statistics are representative of the characteristics of the products relevant for a proper comparison. Outcomes are masked because of comparative advertising, product disparagement and trademark constraints.