Posted on Leave a comment

Mud Fever, Mud Rash and Rain Scald

Mud Fever, Mud Rash and Rain Scald
Share This:

Mud Fever, Mud Rash and Rain Scald are dermatophiloses caused by the actinomycete Dermatophilus congolensis (a gram-positive facultative anaerobic actinomycete bacterium). Prolonged rainfall and warm temperatures reduce the normal superficial protective factors of the skin and predispose horses to clinical lesions. Because Aloeride boosts the normal superficial protective factors of the skin, feeding Aloeride is a sensible, preventative move for mud fever, mud rash and rain scald. The loss of the sebaceous film layer on skin is thought to predispose the animal to development of the disease. You can change that.

“I just wanted to drop you a line and tell you a bit my beautiful Charlie! Charlie is my cheeky 5 year old gelding, who I had great plans for (Seems Charlie didn’t). In the short time I have had him (18 months), he has managed to get stuck in some fencing requiring expert removal (By our local farmer and friends) and a nice vet’s bill and time off. Then he developed mud fever which just wouldn’t go – despite trying everything! I decided to put him on Aloeride because we tried everything and its worked brilliantly! Charlie’s hair is growing back! The skin on his legs is healthy and there is even hair growth. We do protect his legs with barrier cream but this never stopped it before and also hair is growing back over his scars from the fence incident! He is turning into a really handsome boy (Well I would say that being his mum LOL) and his coat just gleams with good health! I’m hoping to get him out to a few shows under saddle this year – so fingers crossed he can keep himself out of trouble!!” Cathy Wright & Charlie Brown

Where does Dermatophilosis come from

Dermatophilus‘ natural habitat is controversial, it is hypothesised that soil could act as a temporary reservoir for the organism. When heavy rain makes the soil soggy, splashes of infected soil transfer Dermatophilus to your horse’ lower limbs. Mud fever ensues if superficial protective factors are insufficient (mud fever a.k.a. mud rash or pastern dermatitis). In respect of exposure, try not to let your horses stand in muddy or flooded paddocks. Oedema, pain and lameness may accompany the mud fever/mud rash. With horses grazing, sadly soil-based Dermatophilus can affect the muzzle also. Rain scald affects the loin, croup and saddle areas. These are muscular and thus warm areas that make attractive lodgings for Dermatophilus when damp. Because Dermatophilus can survive in the skin of horses that are clinically normal (thus potentially acting as a source of infection once favourable conditions -damp heat- are present), isolation of affected horses is definitely wise. Just as this is wise in equine influenza. So, look out for primary papules (transient lesions) that become serous exudates, hair with tufted appearance, lesions with irregular elevated crust like paintbrushes (see header picture). Once there is a skin defect, secondary infection with Staphylococcus spp. or fungal organisms (dermatophytes) may occur.

Feed to make antibacterial lipids

Safer by sebum, Aloeride for superficial protective factors of the skin
Safer by sebum, Aloeride for superficial protective factors of the skin

Some skin surface lipids are synthesised in the epidermis (carried to the surface as cells differentiate, these cells should contain ‘defensive nutrients’ e.g. antimicrobial properties of Zn2+ or Copper-containing proteins) whereas others are secreted onto the surface from the sebaceous glands. In humans one such group is Free Sphingoid Bases which are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. Most remarkably, one of these fatty acids (sapienic acid, C16:1Delta6), in combination with a low concentration of ethanol, is very effective against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In fact, this combination was far more effective than Mupirocin (a gold standard for activity against MRSA) with or without ethanol*. The equivalent fatty acid in your horse’s sebum is Palmitoleic acid, an omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acid. This example should make you appreciate how important it is to have nutrient-laden rather than waste-laden cells being carried to the surface… A 10-week Selly Oak Hospital trial in Birmingham was carried out with both Copper and control surfaces in the same ward. Median numbers of bacteria recovered from surfaces of copper-containing items were between 90% and 100% lower than those from control surfaces. An abundance of inorganic minerals in feed allows these defence helpers to be carried to the surface… We coined the term Safer By Sebum and that is precisely how Charlie got over his long standing problem.

Aloeride optimising nutrition on the inside + helpful hygiene on the outside = robust skin heath and coat health. Click here to read more. Do you remember the adage “a shiny horse is a healthy horse”? Well, this is true ONLY if the oils that a horse ingests and constructs are health-promoting. What is always true is “a healthy horses is a shiny horse” and precisely that is what Aloeride promotes.

Mud Fever, Mud Rash and Rain Scald Tips

  • Grooming is the time to spot the primary lesions.
  • Once there are secondary lesions (crusts, matted hair, skin defects exudation), be very gentle. Avoid vigorous grooming (pain) and over-washing (more wet stuff reducing the normal superficial protective factors). Take extra care drying off.
  • Isolate horse(s) that are affected, yes this may mean stabling which requires additional feeding care. Minimise the risk of exposure.
  • Hospital type of external wound hygiene: rinse with a mild disinfectant 1) 2–3% Chlorhexidine solution applied as a spray or rinse, a broad-spectrum biocide effective against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi or 2) Povidone Iodine Solution, a water-based liquid as a spray after the area has been cleaned and dried, no rinsing necessary. Povidone Iodine Solution does not irritate the skin and can be used under a bandage. Avoid shampoos as these wash away the superficial protective factors of the skin. Do not apply creams, lotions and emollients if there is a risk of trapping the actinomycete Dermatophilus congolensis under it.
  • Hygiene Hygiene Hygiene! Periodically disinfect all your equipment, gear and also the stable/yard surfaces to clear dermatophilus spores. Should you be tempted to bandage your horse then make sure the skin is clean and dry first.
  • Tea tree oil, sulphur compounds like Potassium Aluminium Sulfate or MSM, manuka honey, aloe vera gel, calendula, hypericum, goose grease, petroleum jelly may be wonderful except that none of these feed your horse’s innate protection. So you never get on top of the problem.
  • Roll and harrow your paddocks to help repair winter poaching damage. Drainage is the biggest issue when faced with land susceptible to poaching. A cheap measure could be to have a local farmer mole plough or deep tine aerate. Although we fully understand not everyone has this luxury, 1 horse should be grazed on a minimum of 1 acre.
  • Effective treatment requires avoidance of prolonged exposure to moisture whenever possible, daily topical application of antibacterial sprays or solutions, feed to increase the normal superficial protective factors of the skin. Note that crusts should be disposed of carefully to avoid further environmental contamination. Parenteral antibiotics may occasionally be required in severe cases.
  • Mud Fever, Mud Rash and Rain Scald news on how to helpIf possible, build your horse a shelter. The photograph is genuine and depicts real horses under genuinely gigantic furniture. However, the claim that the furniture was built because the farmer was refused council permission to build a normal shelter is untrue. In fact, although it does provide shade and shelter for the horses in the field, the furniture was primarily built as a novel means of promoting the products of Jens Braun, a German wood merchant. Excessively rainy conditions without appropriate shelter can lead to dilution of this sebaceous layer, thereby increasing the chance of clinical disease. One Aloeride sachet a day can make all the difference to your horse.

* Thematic review series: skin lipids. Antimicrobial lipids at the skin surface.; Drake DR, Brogden KA, Dawson DV, Wertz PW; Journal of lipid research, 2008 Jan;49(1):4-11.

Posted on Leave a comment

How To Completely Transform Your Horse Into A Showing Superstar

Alice Homer feeds Aloeride aloe vera for Showing
Share This:

Alice Homer feeds her show horses AloerideWhether you are aiming at success at your local show or have your eyes set on a future competing at HOYS https://hoys.co.uk getting the basics right can make the difference to winning or losing in the showring. In this blog, we share our top tips for transforming your horse or pony into a showing star. How To Completely Transform Your Horse Into A Showing Superstar!

Hi Have had my young horse on aloeride for 6 weeks in effort to combat insect bite sensitivity. Shine on his coat is now so amazing I have put my veteran on it too and yesterday the physio asked if I was showing him as his condition was “glowing”! Philippa Birtwell.

“Since feeding Aloeride, my horses now have a wonderful, natural bloom to their coats: An essential ingredient for that winning appearance!” Loraine Homer, show rider, judge and top show horse producer.

Presenting The Perfect Picture

Presentation is everything and when it comes to your horse, it is important to display the right image from the start.

Your Tack

Showing saddle Showing numnahA brown leather bridle that fits well is the first thing to look for. Old tack is normally the best but you can now find specialist makers for tack designed for the show ring. Tack must be supple and clean. Always shine your bits up too.

Most show horses are ridden in a double bridle, however, if your horse is young or inexperienced, you can ride in a snaffle or start with a simple rugby pelham.

You would normally find coloured brow-bands on Riding Horses or Hacks, but be careful not to go too heavy on the bling!

The show saddle should be straighter cut then a GP saddle to show off the shoulder but above all, comfortable for the judge to ride in. You can wear a brown numnah under the saddle but it must fit the saddle to the same size. At lower levels, it is normally acceptable for you to ride in your normal saddle.

Your Horse’s Turnout

Always plait up using thread and not elastic bands. A well-pulled mane will help with the correct size and number of plaits.

Most judges prefer to see horses looking natural, so if you are planning to use make-up on your horse do so discreetly. Check society rules on this as it is becoming unpopular with judges. The same goes with overdoing the products on the coat sheen. Aloeride gives horses a lovely natural bloom to their coats, which doesn’t rub off over you or look artificial. It also helps support your horses’ immune system, which is important if you have a busy competition season ahead of you.

Your Showing Outfit

You need to look the part too, so make sure that your show jacket fits well and is clean.

A Navy show jacket is used in hack classes and children’s riding pony classes otherwise a tweed jacket is correct for all other showing disciplines. You should always wear a well-fitting shirt and tie with tiepin and never a stock. Long black leather boots with a pair of cream or canary coloured breeches and brown gloves are essential, and a show cane is the finishing touch.

More and more shows are now requesting that riders wear a hard hat with safety chin strap and we agree it’s best to be safe in the saddle and for in-hand classes.

Good luck and remember not to get despondent if you don’t win. There is always another day/show, and hopefully, these tips will help you and your horse move up the line-up by catching the judge’s eye for all the RIGHT reasons!

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farAdd sparkle to your performance this season and take advantage of our multi-carton special deal with incredible savings, click below

Enjoyed reading this blog, then you might enjoy reading 9 Things You Need To Do For Competition Success.

Posted on Leave a comment

9 Things You Need To Do For Competition Success

7 Things You Need To Do For Competition Success
Share This:

As the clocks go forward this month and we start to focus on enjoying those extra daylight hours with our horses, many of us will be planning our competition schedules. In this month’s blog, we offer our top tips for a successful competition season ahead. Here are 9 Things You Need To Do For Competition Success:

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far1. Forward planning: From your training through to your saddle checks, feeding and farrier appointments. Plan your competition schedule and stable management to ensure that you and your horse are fit and ready for the season ahead.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far2. Get established with a great trainer and stick with them. Even if you can only afford the odd lesson, spend that money wisely on someone whom you feel confident with and understands you and your horse. A great trainer who can give you ‘homework’ until your next lesson will provide you with a great focus and help you and your horse progress. Having the occasional lesson with a different trainer can be hugely beneficial. A different pair of experienced eyes can be very useful. Having lots of different trainers at the same time, however, can confuse you and your horse.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far3. Look after your horse. If the ground is rock hard or we’re experiencing above average temperatures, put your horses’ welfare before a rosette and stay home. There is always another day, another competition and another opportunity but your horse is one in a million.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far4. Look after your equipment. It might sound strange, but caring for your tack and equipment is crucial. Some loose stitching on a girth strap can easily result in an accident if it goes unnoticed, so check over your equipment regularly.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far5. All work and no play is no fun. Remember to keep your training varied and also to have fun with your horse away from the arena. Boxing up and going for a long ride with a friend somewhere new is just the tonic to break up the routine.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far6. Be realistic. It’s great to have ambitions but be realistic in your capabilities and current level of training. Get established and confident at one level before moving up to the next and make sure you are comfortable working at a higher level at home before attempting it in a competitive environment.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far7. Don’t focus on the negative. Everybody has good days and bad days, so instead of reflecting on the bad, learn from it and work on those areas that need improving before your next competitive outing.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far8. Feed your competition horse Aloeride. Many competition horses are thriving on it, not just for health reasons, but for interesting ‘opposites’ like natural calmer and racehorse performance and recovery. Not only is Aloeride NOPS tested but it is full of natural organic aloe vera goodness. Our super strength taste-free sachets help maintain a healthy digestive system and support great skin, hair and hooves. When you feel good, you do good!

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by far9. Remember to enjoy your competitions. Most of us do it for fun, but if your dressage is becoming more stressage and showjumping is turning into a leap too far, take some time out of the arena and have some fun with your horse. Remember your relationship is a partnership inside and outside of the competition arena so make sure you both look forward to your competition outings! Sometimes taking a break can do you both the world of good!

If you loved this blog, you might enjoy reading our TIPS for THOROUGHBRED FEET.

Posted on 1 Comment

How to stop your smoothies being bitsy

How to stop your smoothies being bitsy., healthy advice from Aloeride.
Share This:

One of our Irish friends cannot stand bitsy things in her mouth, she doesn’t like the smoothies. As an athlete she would benefit from smoothies so she asked me to write about how to stop your smoothies being bitsy. The trick is to create a soft mush first, before you add the lumpier ingredients.

This morning a VERY large, diced beetroot was accompanied by a large, diced carrot. Between these two, smoothies can end up tasting bitsy which may turn people off. So, first in go the banana and a pinch of spinach, then add milk kefir to almost cover them. We use the Nourish Kefir. Now close container and WHIZZ. Glorious mush achieved! Open container, add diced carrot and beetroot and WHIZZ. Open container and you can see that it still looks a bit bitsy. Stuff in more spinach, add a generously heaped tablespoon of turmeric, a little black pepper and a slither of ginger. Now pour in as much milk kefir as the container is allowed to hold according to Nutribullet. Close container and WHIZZ with stops and starts. Perfectly fine to whizz for blips of 20 seconds at a time and there’s no need to cool with ice.

The most important of turmeric’s curcuminoids is curcumin. This is the active ingredient that gives turmeric its powerful anti-inflammatory effect, it also is a good antioxidant. There is about 3%wt of curcumin in turmeric which is why we use a heaped tablespoon in every smoothie. Curcumin is poorly absorbed into the bloodstream. Therefore we add some black pepper, this contains piperine, to enhance the bioavailability (absorption) of curcumin by 2,000%. [Planta Medica 1998 May;64(4):353-6; Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Shoba G1, Joy D, Joseph T, Majeed M, Rajendran R, Srinivas PS.] Curcumin is fat soluble and the milk kefir helps not only to offset the impossible taste that 1 heaped tablespoon of turmeric has, but also helps its absorption. We get our organic turmeric powder from buywholefoodsonline.co.uk in a 1kg bag @ £14.83 which is very inexpensive for the anti-inflammatory-help-without-side-effects it provides.

The cup of a Nutribullet Pro allows Mr van de Braak to have 1 pint of smoothie every morning and Mrs van de Braak ½ a pint. Cup and blade-end are rinsed with lukewarm water immediately afterwards and the whole exercise is all very easy and sustainable. We both take our Aloeride vegicapsules at the washstand in the morning .

Doesn’t doing a 10-20 second whizzing blip add temperature to the mixture and destroy enzymes? Bollocks! Our beetroot, carrots, spinach and kefir live in the fridge, if WHIZZING gets their temperature a little closer to my 37 degree body temperature then this is very welcome because I drink a 1 pint smoothie for breakfast. For as long as I have been making smoothies, they’ve always felt ‘cold’ to my tongue and cheeks. No worries about their enzymes then 😉

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE TO READ:
What do smoothies do
A dastardly clever beetroot smoothie

Ingredients:
1 large beetroot
1 large carrot
1 big handful of spinach
1 tbsp (heaped) organic turmeric
½ tsp ground black pepper
1 slither of ginger
1 small banana
200ml milk kefir

1 Aloeride vegicapsule at the washstand morning and night

Posted on 1 Comment

Is aloe vera safe for horses

Is aloe vera safe for horses explained by Aloeride
Share This:

Is aloe vera safe for horses and, if so, is aloe vera always safe for horses and for smaller ponies? Several questions rolled into one, so let’s unravel this: 1 Can aloe vera do harm? (harmful molecules, contamination, degradation) and 2 Can aloe vera be overdosed or underdosed? and 3 Is it evidence based i.e. proof that aloe vera works?

Is aloe vera safe for horses 1

One type of molecule within aloe vera can be troublesome. Its laxative anthraquinones cause diarrhoea. Since horses are naturally on a high fibre diet, constipation is never your problem. Your feed merchant cannot tell you whether or not the aloe vera for sale contains laxative anthraquinones because labels don’t declare this (if they test it in the first place). Should you feed your horse aloe vera properly according to body mass, then you may find that he/she redecorates the stable walls. But, because aloe vera is expensive (discover how affordable Aloeride is) , dosage given is rarely in proper ratio to body mass, so the quantity that is fed rarely causes droppings to become too loose. Is this however the best way to go about things? Imagine if aspirin would cause diarrhoea and you would take a child dosage so as to avoid diarrhoea… would this solve your headache??    Precisely, so why not dose properly with aloe vera that doesn’t contain laxative molecules.

Contamination can be due to soil and processing. Aloe vera is grown commercially below the equator and in the ‘dustbowl’ of Spain (that froze over one year and decimated their aloe vera plants because they forgot to put the antifreeze in – that last bit is a joke) and in Greece. Feed merchants rarely know where the aloe vera they sell was grown. We have lab measurements of South African aloe vera ferox that, according to their B2B marketing material, is used keenly by the beauty industry and yet it had the most atrocious nutritional values but… good enough to put aloe vera on their label! Laugh if you like but not so funny if you bought that product for your horse. China also has started to grow aloe vera commercially. The science director of an internationally accredited via ISO 17025 forensic food science laboratory wrote the book ‘Food Forensics’ which details the heavy metals analysis of over 800 foods, spices, superfoods, pet treats and dietary supplements imported from China, contaminated with toxic heavy metals like lead and mercury. Buy from safe sources, from those who are upfront about where their aloe vera comes from and are upfront about their lab values of nutritional profile.

Dr. Ivan Danhof MD PhD – head of one of the laboratories where Aloeride quality control takes place – wrote to us that some aloe vera products contain β-linked polysaccharides from konjac root (contains approximately 49%–60% glucomannan with a glucose:mannose ratio of approximately 2:3). This is how some manufacturers inflate MeOHPS results to make cheap aloe vera look better in the hope to sell it for more money. Specialist tests however can differentiate between konjac and aloe vera! Sometimes it is not the plant that is degraded but the people who make the product.

Liquid aloe vera goes off. To slow down (but not avoid) bacterial degradation you must put liquid aloe vera in a fridge after a tankard, jug or bottle has been opened. Stabilised aloe vera aims at offsetting oxidation but that doesn’t phase bacteria. What worries bacteria to the point of meeting their Maker is ‘no H2O’. Other than bacteria that produce spores or MRSA (neither are present on the leaf of aloe vera) most bacteria cannot survive without water. That is why Dr Ivan Danhof MD PhD proposed to freeze aloe, extract the water and use only the working solids within aloe vera. Why not deliver all the goodness of aloe vera in dry powder form and outsmart the bacteria.

Is aloe vera safe for horses 2

More often than not, horses are underdosaged on aloe vera. This is because horse owners struggle to afford dosing right. We know this because we are being asked specifically about this. Salespeople do the children’s aspirin trick that makes aloe vera use more affordable but it predictably lowers beneficial effect. Aloeride aloe vera takes into account that there is a 5.88x difference between average human weight and that of an average horse, and with a known polysaccharide binding site occupancy, our serving of 2,000mg/day (400 milliliter equivalent) is a proper dosage for an average horse. Aloeride makes that affordable for your horse.

Average horse weight chart

When you weigh your horse on an equine specific weighbridge or by using a weigh tape (about 90% accurate) you need to remember that body composition is as important as the kilograms/pounds. A para-dressage rider with a horse on Aloeride (header picture in Coat Health and Natural Coat Shine) at 1 sachet/day reported back that her horse had increased weight on the weighbridge but had not increased girth measurement. Yes that means that lean body mass increased i.e. it is a healthy weight increase with more muscle support for joints and so on. Optimum nutritional intake, optimum nutritional uptake. Draft breeds range from approximately 16 to 19 hands and from 1,400 to 2,000 lb (640 to 910 kg), and at 910kg you may consider 1 sachet twice a day if 1 sachet once a day has not already delivered the beneficial effect hoped for. Small ponies have ½ sachet a day (you must close the sachet quickly after dispensing and seal it). Once all the polysaccharide binding sites in your horse’s gut have been occupied, it poops out the excess polysaccharides. Quite frankly overdosing on aloe vera would be very difficult to achieve. Underdosing is commonplace but not with Aloeride.

Is aloe vera safe for horses 3

Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons' coat of arms RCVSMany vets in both large and small animal practice recommend that patients take aloe vera. This can be applied externally in which case laxative anthraquinones do not matter. When aloe vera is administered by mouth many vets are moving away from liquid aloe vera to aloe vera in sachets. This avoids diarrhoea, dramatically improves dosage and there are other practical advantages. Vets can be hesitant about ‘natural remedies’ because often it’s unknown how they are made (no standardisation like drugs) and often there’s little research. In case of aloe vera, there’s a timeline of 4,000 years of use plus a hefty pile of proper research. Aloeride is produced by a UK pharmaceutical clinical trial company. Being safe with aloe vera is a choice.

In July 1844, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons was granted its arms and, due to aloe vera being used widely for the treatment of animals, the RCVS chose to include aloe vera in its coat of arms. The crest displays a wreath of the colours, a centaur proper, holding a shield argent, charged with aloe vera barbadensis miller, also proper (proper indicates natural colouring). The centaur on the crest is presumed to represent Chiron the centaur, the Greek mythological ‘father’ of all medicine. The horse, bull and horseshoe were all included to represent branches of the veterinary art, while the healing arrow pierces the serpent of disease. We are very proud to supply veterinary surgeries with Aloeride.

Posted on Leave a comment

10 Things To Remember When Feeding Your Competition Horse

Aloeride aloe vera eventing Victoria-Bax
Share This:

Feeding your horse the right amount and the right type of fuel can make the difference between a lack lustre performance in the arena or fireworks under saddle. Here are our top tips to remember when feeding your competition horse:

  1. Keep an eye on his weight. Using a weight tape allows you to monitor his weight more effectively than just by the naked eye. Increasing your horses’ workload and traveling can take their toll on his weight so make sure you feed accordingly to his work load and temperament.
  2. Remember forage is vital for a healthy digestive system. If you are spending your days on the road and competing, make sure your horse is still getting enough roughage.
  3. Get expert nutritionist advice to help get the best out of your horses performance by feeding the right type for temperament and level of work.
  4. Water is essential for horses and if your horse Is working hard, he’ll need to replace water lost through sweating. Make sure you supply fresh, clean water at all times and electrolytes if necessary.
  5. Health and vitality come from the inside and show on the outside, so feed the best quality feed and ensure that your feed barn is kept clean and feed is stored in a rodent proof container. Regularly clean feed bowls and utensils.
  6. Competition days are bound to mean a change of routine where feed is concerned, so ensure that your horse has plenty of roughage to support a healthy hindgut.
  7. If you are out for the day, waiting to feed your horse his evening feed, even if a little time later than his usual routine should be fine alongside water and forage.
  8. If you are planning a longer trip or to stay away at a competition venue, make sure you have enough feed and hay with you for the duration and then add in some extra, just in case your stay is longer.
  9. Feed Aloeride. Aloeride is natural organic aloe vera which has wide reaching health benefits for your horse. From supporting healthy digestion, skin, coat and hooves in one easy to feed daily taste-free supplement.
Posted on Leave a comment

The Magic Of Aloe Vera Is Not In Its Water

The magic of aloe vera is not in the water
Share This:

Let me explain why the magic of aloe vera is not in its water. When anybody tells you that aloe vera gel or aloe vera juice is ‘best’ because ‘it is more natural’ or ‘it contains its natural medium’ then remember this: Nature uses water to move stuff from A to B. That is why your body as a whole contains some 60% water, your brain 70%, your blood 83%, your lungs 90% and that is why aloe vera contains 95% water… so it can move its nutrients about and doesn’t run dry during droughts (after all aloe vera is genetically a desert plant).

Nature’s biochemistry works because of the transported stuff and not because of the water. So when it comes to aloe vera, you can get water perfectly fine from your tap water (we think it’s better when you filter it). What you seek is that what fuels the magic, and this is what laboratories measure in abundance inside Aloeride… high levels of working molecules. We freeze the water out which means that all heat-sensitive molecules within whole leaf aloe vera barbadensis miller remain intact (note that Aloeride gives you the water-soluble nutrients via the inner gel as well as the lipid-soluble nutrients from the rind).

Up to 23.4x more nutrients

We assume that you too prefer ‘fact via objective measurement’ over ’emotive marketing’. You see, what aloe vera gel enthusiasts may not know is that independent laboratories time and again measure that Aloeride aloe vera contains very significantly more of the molecules that are responsible for the accolades attributed to aloe vera. By taking the water out responsibly, we are able to put a very great deal more working molecules in a vegetarian capsule or in a sachet. Taking the water out responsibly of course also prevents bacterial degradation, so we don’t have to use (and one can’t react adversely to) stabilisers.

Aloeride gives you those 5% working (incl. beta-linked polysaccharide) molecules because they work the magic, notably the orchestration of the other molecules. Aloe’s 95% water is just the medium that enables movement from A to B (true within soil, within any plant, within any mammal outside its cells). Water is not what aloe vera’s many accolades are based upon, otherwise water would have received that same praise. That’s deliriously simple isn’t it. Beware that for some manufacturers the magic of aloe vera is in its water… check out Product 2a and 3b in the independent laboratory tests. Yep, watering down aloe vera don’t stop them from charging high prices.

Magic of water

For fullness of information, certain water is  magical.  Inside healthy body cells  (yours and those of your horse), water models itself with protein carboxylate groups into low-density clathrate structures. However, in order to achieve this, a strong potassium bias and ample adenosine triphosphate is necessary. The point is, water inside aloe vera does not contribute to your clathrate structuring, but eating loads of (raw) vegetables and certain fruits does (daily turn out on large, varying pasture for your horse), reducing the amount of sugar you ingest does, reducing the amount of sodium you ingest does… So, talk about aloe vera ‘original medium’ (aloe vera water) alludes to the magic properties of water that it possesses INSIDE healthy body cells. It’s the marketing talk of smoke and mirrors. The magic of aloe vera is not in its water…

Posted on Leave a comment

Comfortable Movement and Suppleness

Aloeride aloe vera comfortable movement suppleness
Share This:

Comfortable movement and suppleness is necessary for a winning performance, whichever equine discipline you enjoy. Training for power, stamina and coordination will only become free and graceful movement if your horse has comfortable movement and suppleness. Aloeride helps achieve comfortable movement and suppleness and we would love to explain how that works. Whatever your equine discipline, here are 5 make or break points for comfortable movement and suppleness.

The Biochemical Soup

Biochemical soup affects suppleness and movementThe ground substance of the various tissues and organs in your horse is known as connective tissue which on cellular level is called interstitial tissue. The space in between this tissue is called the interstitium which is filled with interstitial fluid.

Interstitial fluid is the all important biochemical soup that pretty much every tissue in your horse depends on. Its composition is affected by toxic burden, detoxification capacity*, blood sugar regulation*, hormones*. The pH of interstitial fluid is not constant (*these are nutrient-dependent factors). If the ‘soup’ goes wrong, your horse goes wrong. Nutritionists talk about alkaline-ash forming food/feed and acid-ash forming food/feed… feed changes the acid-alkaline level of ‘the soup’ and this has implications for comfortable movement & suppleness: a horse on a high protein diet is more likely to be prone to tissue stiffness, is likely to have less tolerance for lactic acid loading. A more acidic interstitium renders connective less flexible and thus it becomes more prone to strain and subsequent (micro)inflammation. Microinflammation in turn sets off a degree of reactive spasm. These are precisely the issues you are trying to find a solution for! Muscle stretches as shown in the header picture, or deep massage, or any type of joint mobilisation (by chiropractor, osteopath, physiotherapist, massage therapist) works better when the interstitial tissue is neutral-alkaline. That is why many of them recommend that you use Aloeride. Between its support for digestive health and a unique, very broad nutrient spectrum, it contributes to a healthier ‘biochemical soup’ and enhances the efforts of your chiropractor/osteopath/physiotherapist.

The natural suppleness supplement

Chloe Ammonds-Nutt feeds Aloeride

After 23 days on Aloeride the difference was obvious. His behaviour, performance, and settled attitude is fantastic. The changes I have noticed are:
• He no longer fidgets or is unsettled, constantly moving about when tied up.
• He no longer feels like he’s about to explode/shoots off as soon as you mount
• He doesn’t bolt his food (he still eats fairly quickly but not with as much tension)
• He is much more relaxed when travelling and at competition
• He is more accepting of the leg and willing to flex in his neck and body
• His neck/neck muscles in particular are much softer, which has improved his flatwork
• His jump is positive and athletic
• He no longer feels like he’s behind the leg or ‘backing up’ he is forwards and free moving
• He is off all other supplements except his magnesium calmer now. How’s that?!

Chloe Ammonds-Nutt (Wiltshire )

Tissue Comfort

Equine hydrotherapyAn uncomfortable horse underperforms. Direct trauma and neuralgia aside, the two commonest reasons for tissue discomfort are (micro)inflammations and lactic acid burden. If you need comfortable movement and suppleness in horses, you must be on top of both these issues. Lactic acid is produced during anaerobic energy production (oxygen deprived), so a better supply of oxygen to tissue will reduce the burden. Lactic acid is water soluble, so keeping your horse hydrated is vital for detox. The speed at which lactic acid is broken down depends on available intramuscular carnosine which in turn is limited by the amount of available β-alanine. This originates from dietary peptides such as carnosine or anserine and vitamin B5 in feed and in Aloeride plus made by bacterial flora in your horse’s intestines (Aloeride supports this). Ingestion of only carnosine results in only 40% becoming available as β-alanine; another reminder that Nature doesn’t work in single nutrients, it always works in a synergistic spectrum. Note also that discomfort caused by lactic acid is a defence mechanism to stop overworking and damaging; lactic acid tolerance can be improved greatly by anaerobic threshold training. Equine hydrotherapy (non-weight bearing, no fixed point) is a fantastic way to both address (micro)inflammation and lactic acid burden.

Besides help for lactic acid breakdown, Aloeride provides a unique spectrum of molecules that help to maintain normal tissue temperature. Localised raises in temperature cause reactive muscle contraction and this without fail reduces agility of movement (because a contracted muscle doesn’t stretch). Helping this is one of the reasons why Aloeride did so well in Tried & Tested with both the Veteran Horse Society and Blue Cross.

Soft Tissue Mobility

The active range of movement that a leg or the body of your horse has, can be greatly improved by passive stretches and joint mobilisations. Transverse frictions are best to mobilise cross-linkages of fibrous strands in muscle tissue. Applied pressure on myofascial points may relieve muscle tension but rarely does so for long if the trigger isn’t removed, reactive spasm is never caused by a fascia. Long massage strokes can improve circulation but then so do horse walkers and equine hydrotherapy. Ideally all this is followed by full limb and neck stretches such as depicted in the header image and a review of training in recurring issues is advisable. My point is that chiro, osteo, physio, bowen or equine massage people are called in because your horse is blocked, constricted, stiff, tense or goes short or worse still is lame. Beyond their physical ministrations, well-informed professionals recommend Aloeride because it broadens the help they bring.

Our advice to Chloe and to you is that adding Magnesium only ever works in horses that are Magnesium depleted and this is unlikely to happen in Aloeride nutrient loaded horses. I wrote about calmers and, in respect of movement and suppleness, these aim at the contractile fibres of muscle. If there’s reactive spasm, then calmers are unlikely to be effective on contractions without sorting the (micro)inflammation first. Passive stretches, as shown in the header image aim at the connective tissue inside the muscle (white in image), not at the contractile fibres (red in image). The massage technique of transverse friction mobilises connective tissue but does so very localised, it also improves local blood flow depending on how it is done.

Muscle Stability

One of our sponsored riders was fastidious about veterinary checks for her horse. Fairly quickly after it has started on Aloeride -already on an excellent feed-, its lean body mass improved (topline as well as muscle definition everywhere else). Her vet measured the total weight to have gone up by 60kgs in 2½-3 months whilst girth remained unaltered. In Dresssage for instance this can improve the back and hindlimb strength for better collection (Impulsion), in Eventing the stronger horse runs faster and jumps better, in Endurance stronger muscles cope better. Another practical advantage is that a muscularly strong horse has less chance of joint strains (muscle providing stability to a joint). However, improved lean muscle mass means little without it being trained and co-ordinated. The thing to appreciate is that you would train (and compete) from a greater abundance. More trained muscle literally puts your horse in a position of controlable strength. Kindly note that with Aloeride you cannot put on more muscle than what your horse is genetically predisposed to, Aloeride optimises naturally condition if there is an intake/uptake issue.

Coordination

Once your horse is comfortable and agile, coordination is a matter of training. Practice makes perfect and do make sure there is fun in it for your horse, you’ll achieve more by dominant persuasion than by force.