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How to reduce the risk of equine influenza

Equine influenza what you can feed to help beyond vaccination.
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You want to know how to reduce the risk of equine influenza? Whereas vaccination schedules are the preferred method of control (compulsory when competing under BHA, FEI and affiliated governing bodies), there is more you can do to reduce the risk of equine influenza. Host resistance and viral exposure is an old chestnut but, in isolating affected horses from healthy horses, you separate differing host resistances. Unsurprisingly, certain types of feed nutrients make it more difficult for a virus to infect a horse. A risk-managed return to racing will start on Wednesday 13th February.

We supply several competition yards that are very keen on optimum nutrition. These look after horses that are frequently transported and mixed extensively (e.g. racing, training, sales, shows). These use Aloeride in their feed mix for many good reasons and have done so long before equine flu crossed anyone’s mind. Since the first case at Donald McCain and outbreaks in nine counties since, they are extra glad with the Aloeride! Beyond contingency plans and robust containment measures, there is optimum nutrition. Below is how airborne equine influenza operates and how nutrition may help you; a sentence (bold below) out of a Horse & Hound article has been broken up for commenting:

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farOnce the virus has been inhaled, it invades the lining (epithelium) of the airway,  From What Does Aloe Vera Do you know that aloe vera focuses on the health of epithelium. Your horse fights viral invasion at mucociliary level (enzymes and secretory immunoglobulin A) and, slightly deeper, basal layers contain a tight network of dendritic cells that sense and catch any invading organisms and bring them to the draining lymph nodes to generate the adaptive immunity. Airway mucous (i.e. muco in mucociliary) is a complex of mucins, electrolytes, enzymes, protein defenses that immobilise, destroy and remove noxious particles, foreign bodies and invading microorganisms. Such guns can be loaded and fired with the ammunition that is optimum nutrition.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farwhich becomes inflamed, producing a very sore throat and a nasty cough.  From What Does Aloe Vera Do you know that aloe vera has molecules with cooling properties. Are such molecules preserved during processing and what dosage is given to the horse… Each sachet of Aloeride contains 2,000mg (i.e. 400ml equivalent) of Soil Association Certified Organic aloe vera barbadensis miller. So yes, that’s nearly ½ litre every day of the best in class. In uncomplicated cases horses should recover completely and return to athletic function within three to six weeks of infection.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farThis damage causes patches of the membranes (lining the airways) to ulcerate,  From What Does Aloe Vera Do you know why aloe vera is so superbly good at swiftly fixing the breached epithelial areas. For complicated cases horses may need up to three months of rest. Horses that develop secondary bacterial infections require longer convalescence still, also they have a more conservative prognosis for return to athletic function due to damage to the lung tissue (e.g. fibrosis). That is why reducing the chance of ulceration is so valuable and optimum nutrition can help with this.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farwhich disrupts the clearance of mucus and debris from the airways. Bacteria invade these damaged areas leading to further infections.  Optimum nutrition (good feed enhanced by for instance Aloeride that supports feed nutrient uptake in addition to providing its own unique spectrum of nutrients) makes it possible for an immune system to fight robustly. Airway mucous can defend against viral invasion if horses ingest a wide(r) spectrum of electrolytes (note that these are necessary to build complex enzymes), a broad(er) spectrum of amino acids, and of course vitamins. Whereas even the most average racehorse is treated like a prince, keeping its nutritional intake & uptake apace with its nutritional expenditure during training and racing is a challenge. If supplementation is narrow, some electrolyte levels may remain low and, if this goes undetected (serum Zinc for instance is the poorest indicator to detect deficiency whereas sweat Zinc is the best), then performance gradually will suffer.

Aloe vera interacts with influenza virus particles

In the September 2018 issue of Frontiers in Microbiology research was published that in vitro test revealed that aloe vera polysaccharides could inhibit the replication of a H1N1 subtype influenza virus. The most obvious inhibitory effect was observed in the viral adsorption period (so that’s where the equine flu virus tries to venture past the mucociliary barrier). Transmission electron microscopy indicated that aloe vera polysaccharides directly interacted with influenza virus particles. These long and very long chain polysaccharides are absorbed into the bloodstream intact and flow from the gut to the point of nasal entry. Notably the 2.0×106 and the 1.0×106 fractions are immune modulating. Buyer beware of the huge differences between aloe vera products and obviously the dosage is of paramount importance.

Humans get infected with influenza A (H1N1) or its mutation 2009 H1N1 (the latter caused the first influenza pandemic in more than 40 years). The virus that currently circulates in horse populations is subtype A2 (H3N8) with an earlier subtype A1 (H7N7) now believed to be extinct in horses. Vaccination revs-up immune cells solely for the viral strain that was contained in the vaccine: H7N7 vaccines do not work optimally for the H3N8 virus, and H1N1 vaccines do not work optimally for 2009H1N1. What is rarely mentioned is that free-radical induced pathogenicity in virus infections is of great importance.

In case you wonder what ‘H’ and ‘N’ stand for, influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N). Aloe Polysaccharides Inhibit Influenza A Virus Infection-A Promising Natural Anti-flu Drug; Sun Z., Yu C., Wang W., Yu G., Zhang T., Zhang L., Zhang J., Wei K.; Frontiers in Microbiology 2018 Sep 27;9:2338.

Aloe vera squelches free radicals that increase equine flu virus pathogenicity

It is racing and competition yards that want to know how to reduce the risk of equine influenza. Theirs are young susceptible horses that are frequently transported and mixed extensively. The entry point of the A2 (H3N8) strain is the upper respiratory tract. In humans, ultra-marathon training and competing seems to lead to a depression of the immune function with an increased prevalence of infections of the upper respiratory tract… So what is it with über fit humans and über fit horses that renders them vulnerable to infection? Changes in redox homeostasis in infected cells are one of the key events that is linked to infection with respiratory viruses and linked to inflammation and subsequent tissue damage. In case you have not heard of this before, redox biology embraces events involving shift of balance between reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) production and their scavenging.

How to reduce the risk of equine influenza: Aloeride feeds aminoacids in antioxidant cascade

In a horse, equine flu viral subtype A2 (H3N8) + nasal nitric oxide (which normally increases the uptake of oxygen into horse’s blood) produces highly reactive nitrogen oxide species, such as peroxynitrite. This suppresses type 1 helper T cell-dependent immune responses during infections, leading to type 2 helper T cell-biased immunological host responses. An i2-skewed milieu is also created by grouped aberrant cells, which allows them to escape eradication by type 1 immunity… i.e. a shift from TH1 to TH2 helps the equine flu virus venture past the mucociliary barrier. How might you stop that from happening? By feeding the antioxidant cascades! Both glutamine and vitamin C are known to have beneficial effects on upper airway infections in ultra-marathoners. For the vets among you, the intake of vitamin C does not lead to a change in various infection parameters such as immune cells, interleukins, or interferon (Nieman et al., 2002). Nor does the intake of aloe vera necessarily, but both translate into a lower susceptibility to infection.

Free radicals (reactive oxygen species ROS) are rendered harmless by the electrons donated by vitamin C which, in turn, becomes a (less harmful) vitamin C radical. Then vitamin E donates an electron to the vitamin C radical (restoring it back to a healthy vitamin C) and you’re left with a (lesser harmful still) vitamin E radical. As you can guess, glutathione now donates an electron to the vitamin E radical. Your horse needs glutamine, glycine and cysteine to make glutathione. Training and racing use up these protective nutritional resources. The concentration of glutamine in the blood is reduced by up to 20% after an ultra-marathon (Castell and Newsholme, 1997) which means that less redox protection is available for the upper respiratory tract. Makes a competition horse a ‘welcoming’ host for subtype A2 (H3N8).

Aloe vera contains 7 out of the 8 dietary essential amino acids (Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Valine, there’s no consensus on Tryptophan yet). Aloe vera contains 12 dietary non-essential amino acids (Alanine, Arginine, Asparagine, Cysteine, Glutamic Acid, Glycine, Histidine, Proline, Serine, Tyrosine, Glutamine, Aspartic Acid). With Aloeride feeding 2,000mg = 400ml per serving, you would need to add a daily dosage of natural vitamin C as part of the feed mix. All three of the horses affected at McCain’s stable had been vaccinated which prompted immediate concern that a new strain of the equine influenza could spread rapidly through the racing industry. Perhaps an open minded review of the feed mix could advance how to reduce the risk of equine influenza.

How to reduce the risk of equine influenza

We have assumed that, beyond the above advice on how optimum nutrition could be useful in equine influenza, you know the general advice given on equine influenza. Still, it doesn’t hurt including the BHA endorsed Animal Health Trust advice in this webpage:

  • Signs of influenza may include lethargy/poor performance, loss of appetite, coughing (dry/harsh/hacking), fever (> 38.5° Celcius), nasal discharge.
  • Flu vaccination should provide your horse with good protection against flu. If your horse was to encounter flu, clinical signs will typically be much less severe, your horse would get better much faster and will also spread less virus, meaning, other horses will be less likely to get sick. Vaccination should be used in conjunction with the below other important preventative measures.
  • Protocol for new arrivals: Flu often occurs shortly after the arrival of new horses on to a premises and yards should have protocols in place for quarantining new arrivals for a period of time (ideally in isolation facilities for 3 weeks) before mixing them with resident horses. Before arrival, confirm the new horse is vaccinated against flu and discuss other infectious disease screening tests with your vet.
  • Good general hygiene practices: Wash your hands between handling different horses and use designated equipment for each horse. Events are good places for the circulation of infectious diseases. When away from the yard, take your own equipment, including water buckets and water. Avoid communal areas and contact with other horses. Disinfect all equipment including your trailer, when you arrive back at the yard. Closely monitor your horse too, as movement and mixing with other horses means your horse is at a higher risk of getting an infection, like flu.
  • Be prepared: Do you have yard facilities if a horse requires isolation? A completely separate stable, ideally 25m from other horses and no shared airspace is needed. You must use separate equipment, handlers (or if this is not possible; protective clothing, gloves, separate boots and care for the isolated horse after all other horses) and muck heap when dealing with a horse in isolation. Temporary isolation can be set up by moving other horses away from the stable area/block and using it just for the isolated horse. Taping off the area and using clear signage makes others aware to avoid the area, with disinfectant foot dip and hand washing at the entrance/exit.
  • If flu is suspected on your yard: Call your vet and they can take a swab sample from your horse’s nose and a blood sample, to confirm if your horse has flu. If your horse has been sick for a while before you call the vet, it can be harder to diagnose your horse correctly. Swabs are best taken early on in the course of the infection. Samples can be tested for free through the Animal Health Trust’s equine influenza surveillance scheme. This scheme is kindly supported by the Horserace Betting Levy Board. If your vet hasn’t signed up to our scheme, ask them to contact us. If you suspect another horse on your yard may also have had flu-like signs, they can also be sampled through this scheme.
  • Steps to take if a case of flu is confirmed at your yard: Your vet will advise you on treatment for the horse. Measures to prevent the spread of flu will be yard specific and tailor-made by your vet, with assistance from the Animal Health Trust’s veterinary epidemiology team and will include: Isolation of infected horses. All horse movements on and off the yard should be stopped. Monitor all horses on the yard for clinical signs and record their rectal temperature daily, it should be less than 38.5˚C (your vet can advise you on how to do this if you are unsure). A rise in temperature can be an early sign of an infection. Booster vaccinating all in-contact horses, even if they are not yet due their annual booster, has been shown to provide horses with even more protection against flu.

The role of nutrition is nowhere to be seen in the official communiqués about equine influenza. We champion the view that, if you feed your horse the nutrients and antioxidants that fight off viruses, you thereby reduce the risk of equine influenza. The fact that all three of the horses affected at Donald McCain’s yard had been vaccinated prompted immediate concern that a new strain of the disease could spread rapidly through the racing industry. It prompted me to write about what competition yards and racehorse owners may want to consider beyond vaccination. Nutritional suggestions may inconvenience those who promote animal health and welfare by assuring the safety, quality and efficacy of veterinary medicines.

Update from BETA’s Philippa Macintosh on 13/02/19: “The British Equestrian Federation (BEF) notes the latest update from the Animal Health Trust (AHT) that there have been three further positive tests for equine flu in Kent, Derbyshire and central Scotland. Although there have been a relatively small number of positive tests from the thousands of samples taken by the AHT, the BEF continues to urge horse owners to be vigilant for symptoms of equine flu and to call their vet if they think their horses are showing signs. Vaccinations are vital in tackling the spread of the disease so all owners must ensure that their vaccination records are up to date, and if it’s been longer than 6 months since the last vaccination we recommend discussing a booster with their veterinary surgeon. The BEF also notes that the AHT reports that in all 3 cases, the horses that tested positive were recently imported from Ireland or had had contact with other recently imported horses. Therefore the BEF asks owners to consider that any contact with recently imported horses represents increased risk as there have also been outbreaks of equine flu in other member states including France and Germany. All owners should follow veterinary advice by isolating any recently imported horses for a period of at least 21 days.”

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5 Reasons To Love Your Horse More Than Your Partner

5 Reasons To Love Your Horse More Than Your Partner
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If your idea of ‘tall, dark and handsome’ comes in equine form, then our latest blog just in time for Valentine’s Day is just what cupid ordered! We know you probably didn’t need any reasons to love your horse more than you already do, but here’s a few anyway…

1. Your horse will never moan about the state of the house, the lack of food in the fridge or how many hours you spend down at the yard. Forget his usual treats though, and you may have issues.

2. Your horse is always pleased to see you (unless he’s having fun in the field with his friends) in which case, he might be a little distracted.
But then he will be extra pleased to see you when you return with that feed bucket.

3. Your horse will never judge your wardrobe or your hair and make-up. Which is a blessing, considering these aren’t on your agenda when you are trying to cope with gale force winds, snow storms, mud and more mud.

4. Your horse loves the food you serve up. Not forgetting those after dinner (polo) mints he gets when you leave the yard. * As long as dinner is served on time. Any slight delay will result in excessive drama including acrobatic moves and extreme door kicking, thus disturbing anyone else who wanted to enjoy their dinner in the peace and quiet.

5. Your horse will never moan about the endless stream of vet/farrier/feed/bedding/rug repair bills or the fact that you are always too tired to do anything after 9 pm and are constantly broke.

Want to keep the one you love in the best of health? Discover why horse owners worldwide trust Aloeride…

Enjoyed reading this blog? You might like to read what our expert wrote about DIGESTIVE HEALTH SUPPORT.

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Is aloe vera safe for horses

Is aloe vera safe for horses explained by Aloeride
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Is aloe vera safe for horses and, if so, is aloe vera always safe for horses and for smaller ponies? Several questions rolled into one, so let’s unravel this: 1 Can aloe vera do harm? (harmful molecules, contamination, degradation) and 2 Can aloe vera be overdosed or underdosed? and 3 Is it evidence based i.e. proof that aloe vera works?

Is aloe vera safe for horses 1

One type of molecule within aloe vera can be troublesome. Its laxative anthraquinones cause diarrhoea. Since horses are naturally on a high fibre diet, constipation is never your problem. Your feed merchant cannot tell you whether or not the aloe vera for sale contains laxative anthraquinones because labels don’t declare this (if they test it in the first place). Should you feed your horse aloe vera properly according to body mass, then you may find that he/she redecorates the stable walls. But, because aloe vera is expensive (discover how affordable Aloeride is) , dosage given is rarely in proper ratio to body mass, so the quantity that is fed rarely causes droppings to become too loose. Is this however the best way to go about things? Imagine if aspirin would cause diarrhoea and you would take a child dosage so as to avoid diarrhoea… would this solve your headache??    Precisely, so why not dose properly with aloe vera that doesn’t contain laxative molecules.

Contamination can be due to soil and processing. Aloe vera is grown commercially below the equator and in the ‘dustbowl’ of Spain (that froze over one year and decimated their aloe vera plants because they forgot to put the antifreeze in – that last bit is a joke) and in Greece. Feed merchants rarely know where the aloe vera they sell was grown. We have lab measurements of South African aloe vera ferox that, according to their B2B marketing material, is used keenly by the beauty industry and yet it had the most atrocious nutritional values but… good enough to put aloe vera on their label! Laugh if you like but not so funny if you bought that product for your horse. China also has started to grow aloe vera commercially. The science director of an internationally accredited via ISO 17025 forensic food science laboratory wrote the book ‘Food Forensics’ which details the heavy metals analysis of over 800 foods, spices, superfoods, pet treats and dietary supplements imported from China, contaminated with toxic heavy metals like lead and mercury. Buy from safe sources, from those who are upfront about where their aloe vera comes from and are upfront about their lab values of nutritional profile.

Dr. Ivan Danhof MD PhD – head of one of the laboratories where Aloeride quality control takes place – wrote to us that some aloe vera products contain β-linked polysaccharides from konjac root (contains approximately 49%–60% glucomannan with a glucose:mannose ratio of approximately 2:3). This is how some manufacturers inflate MeOHPS results to make cheap aloe vera look better in the hope to sell it for more money. Specialist tests however can differentiate between konjac and aloe vera! Sometimes it is not the plant that is degraded but the people who make the product.

Liquid aloe vera goes off. To slow down (but not avoid) bacterial degradation you must put liquid aloe vera in a fridge after a tankard, jug or bottle has been opened. Stabilised aloe vera aims at offsetting oxidation but that doesn’t phase bacteria. What worries bacteria to the point of meeting their Maker is ‘no H2O’. Other than bacteria that produce spores or MRSA (neither are present on the leaf of aloe vera) most bacteria cannot survive without water. That is why Dr Ivan Danhof MD PhD proposed to freeze aloe, extract the water and use only the working solids within aloe vera. Why not deliver all the goodness of aloe vera in dry powder form and outsmart the bacteria.

Is aloe vera safe for horses 2

More often than not, horses are underdosaged on aloe vera. This is because horse owners struggle to afford dosing right. We know this because we are being asked specifically about this. Salespeople do the children’s aspirin trick that makes aloe vera use more affordable but it predictably lowers beneficial effect. Aloeride aloe vera takes into account that there is a 5.88x difference between average human weight and that of an average horse, and with a known polysaccharide binding site occupancy, our serving of 2,000mg/day (400 milliliter equivalent) is a proper dosage for an average horse. Aloeride makes that affordable for your horse.

Average horse weight chart

When you weigh your horse on an equine specific weighbridge or by using a weigh tape (about 90% accurate) you need to remember that body composition is as important as the kilograms/pounds. A para-dressage rider with a horse on Aloeride (header picture in Coat Health and Natural Coat Shine) at 1 sachet/day reported back that her horse had increased weight on the weighbridge but had not increased girth measurement. Yes that means that lean body mass increased i.e. it is a healthy weight increase with more muscle support for joints and so on. Optimum nutritional intake, optimum nutritional uptake. Draft breeds range from approximately 16 to 19 hands and from 1,400 to 2,000 lb (640 to 910 kg), and at 910kg you may consider 1 sachet twice a day if 1 sachet once a day has not already delivered the beneficial effect hoped for. Small ponies have ½ sachet a day (you must close the sachet quickly after dispensing and seal it). Once all the polysaccharide binding sites in your horse’s gut have been occupied, it poops out the excess polysaccharides. Quite frankly overdosing on aloe vera would be very difficult to achieve. Underdosing is commonplace but not with Aloeride.

Is aloe vera safe for horses 3

Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons' coat of arms RCVSMany vets in both large and small animal practice recommend that patients take aloe vera. This can be applied externally in which case laxative anthraquinones do not matter. When aloe vera is administered by mouth many vets are moving away from liquid aloe vera to aloe vera in sachets. This avoids diarrhoea, dramatically improves dosage and there are other practical advantages. Vets can be hesitant about ‘natural remedies’ because often it’s unknown how they are made (no standardisation like drugs) and often there’s little research. In case of aloe vera, there’s a timeline of 4,000 years of use plus a hefty pile of proper research. Aloeride is produced by a UK pharmaceutical clinical trial company. Being safe with aloe vera is a choice.

In July 1844, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons was granted its arms and, due to aloe vera being used widely for the treatment of animals, the RCVS chose to include aloe vera in its coat of arms. The crest displays a wreath of the colours, a centaur proper, holding a shield argent, charged with aloe vera barbadensis miller, also proper (proper indicates natural colouring). The centaur on the crest is presumed to represent Chiron the centaur, the Greek mythological ‘father’ of all medicine. The horse, bull and horseshoe were all included to represent branches of the veterinary art, while the healing arrow pierces the serpent of disease. We are very proud to supply veterinary surgeries with Aloeride.

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10 TIPS for surviving winter with your horse

10 TIPS for surviving winter with your horse (Aloeride)
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1. Win the lottery and put your horse on full livery. Let someone else deal with the misery of winter with horses, while you jet off to somewhere hot and sunny and return in May with a nice suntan and feel refreshed ready for the competition season ahead.

2. Eat lots of chocolate and wear lots of layers. No one is going to judge you (well not us).

3. Appreciate that your ‘yard attire’ is a strong look which generally will look out of place away from the stables or barn. Be prepared to be the focus of everyone’s attention including the security guard should you decide to pop into the supermarket on the way home.

4. Accept that you have a good six months of hellish weather conditions and silly horse season ahead and prepare mentally for the challenge. Sharing titbits of advice with your fellow yard mates can also unite you; ‘Don’t leave the kettle empty when you leave at night’ is one essential which will mean that the first person at the yard in the morning will be able to enjoy a cuppa’. Failure to do this will see you as a stable outcast.

5. Be prepared for the twice-daily work-out that is called rug changing. Designed to help build shoulder, back and upper arm muscles, this routine will ensure you step into spring looking super toned or with a considerable chiro bill and nerve damage.

6. Enjoy the wheelbarrow challenge which is poo-picking the fields. If you can navigate through knee-high mud to tend to your fields without losing your footwear or the wheelbarrow, bask in that moment with pride. It might be shortlived.

7. Celebrate your amazing ability to fix virtually everything with WD40 spray, bailing twine and tape. This sadly does not apply to your horse, but for everything else, there is a way.

8. Enjoy those small moments of winter horsey life such as huddling around one small portable radiator at the yard in minus zero conditions and your horse coming in from the field without another ripped rug/lost shoe/boot/overreach boot.

9. Acknowledge the endless cycle of horse laundry that your home will enjoy as you decorate every available space and radiator with saddlecloths, boots, bandages etc. Embrace that wonderful musty horsey aroma as it impregnates every soft furnishing in the house. Ahh, J’adore Le Horse.

10. Get a wall planner so you can cross off the days until the clocks change again. Get creative; you could even put weather symbols each day to keep a track on the weather. Actually, don’t do that. No one wants to see that kind of negativity.

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How To Prevent Dehydration In Your Horse This Winter

How To Prevent Dehydration In Your Horse This Winter
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Many horse owners believe that hydration is more important during the hotter months, but as we approach the colder winter months, we discuss why ensuring your horse stays hydrated during the winter months is equally as important. Here are tips on how to prevent dehydration in your horse this winter:

Horse Hydration Facts

Did you know that your average horse needs between 20 – 30 litres of water a day, and even more so if they are exercising, to keep them healthy and hydrated. A horse’s body is made up of around 70% water, as an average, so it’s important to keep your horse hydrated, especially as dehydration can have serious health implications for the horse. What more than H2O does your horse need to keep itself hydrated?

Health Implementations

In human Medicine, unrecognised dehydration can presents as TATT… (tired all the time). It is not a bad first check for when a horse’s performance is slightly under par. The most significant risk posed to the horse with dehydration is the risk of colic. The reason for this is that horses store water in their gastric tract and if this dries out it can lead to impaction colic. With longer hours being stabled, and increased fibre uptake, the combination of both can have a detrimental effect on your horse’s digestive system. Fortunately, Aloeride can help support hydration. It does that by providing a raft of very necessary, inorganic minerals that help to secure that the H2O your horse drank, stays inside for long enough to benefit.

Spot The Signs

Signs of dehydration are important to look out for and spotting them early can make a difference in dealing with a problem or an emergency.
Signs that your horse might be dehydrated include, but are not exclusive to,:

* Your horse looks dull and depressed (remember TATT)
* Not passing urine or dark urine
* Gums and eyelids are dark red instead of a healthy pink colour

Pinching your horse’s skin to see how long it takes to ping back is no longer considered a reliable way of assessing your horse’s hydrated state. A blood test taken by your vet will be able to determine what is wrong and we recommend always consulting your vet if you are the slightest bit concerned.

Ice Ice Baby

When the colder weather arrives, it’s even more critical to ensure that your horse has free access to water and some horses do not like drinking freezing cold water, so adding a little hot, to the water to keep it a nice palatable temperature, can encourage fussy drinkers. Also if you give water via buckets, keep an eye on their intake as part of your daily routine so you can spot any sudden changes in their drinking habits. Make sure that your water troughs are clear of ice so that your horse has access to water out in the field and soak hay or feed haylage as opposed to dry hay to increase his moisture levels. If your horse is drinking less, then it might be an idea to add electrolytes or a teaspoon of salt to his feed to encourage him to drink, but again speak to your vet if you are concerned.

Hair Today Gone Tomorrow
If you are working your horse over the winter and he is sweating each time you ride, you should consider clipping him to remove the hair which is causing him to sweat, even if it is just a blanket clip with a neck. This will not only make him feel more comfortable when being ridden but keep him cooler than trying to work out in a heavy winter coat!

If you enjoyed reading this blog, you might enjoy reading Electrolyte Status During Exercise.

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Why I still love this supplement

Tamsin Drew Eventing with Aloeride aloe vera
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Hello, my name is Tamsin Drew. I am a Three Day Eventer who has supplemented my horse with Aloeride aloe vera over the last three years. It has been amazing – and thank you Aloeride for the continued support – so you too may be interested in why I still love this supplement Aloeride. Ziggy is my gorgeous 16h3 Irish Hunter gelding (Sire was Kennedys Clover, son of the legendary Clover Hill, that stands at Ballinamuddagh Stud in County Wexford. Dam was ISH Gorsehill Lady) that foaled in 2009, so he’s only nine years old.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farI’ve been using Aloeride for 3 years and love how the multi supplement keeps Ziggy looking and feeling great, with super coat shine and overall condition.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farAloeride provides Ziggy with really strong hooves, no cracking or brittleness and not once has he lost a shoe or needed an extra farrier visit!

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farIt’s the only supplement I use for digestion which supports healthy and happy gut, both in the stable, travelling or competing. A huge difference seen since feeding Aloeride, no upset troubled stomach or loose stools, so much more relaxed and comfortable in the stable and really chilled when arrives at a horse trials.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farSuper thick fuller mane and tail which wouldn’t look out of place in the show ring! Such a change since Ziggy arrived pre-Aloeride when his tail was extremely thin, brittle and just broke off and now it’s glossy, thick and shiny, I never dreamed it could look so good.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farZiggy’s coat looks immaculate no extra brushing, coat shine products or supplements required Aloeride has kept him looking healthy and well all year round.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farThis natural supplement has ingredients which helps support movement and suppleness, encouraging a softer outline and more relaxed dressage test for better marks, achieving our personal best dressage test this year and continued to receive consistent 70% test marks.

checkmark Aloeride aloe vera - Best British Aloe Vera by farOverall better muscle definition and top line, feeling and looking stronger and fitter. Thank you Aloeride, I love being a brand ambassador for you!!!

Image (Buckminster Park HT 2018) courtesy of Action Replay Photography Ltd

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When a racehorse jockey breaks his back

When a racehorse jockey breaks his back
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During a chat at a racing yard that uses Aloeride, banter moved from the benefits of Aloeride and the training of Thoroughbreds to a detailed talk about an injury sustained by a young jockey. When a racehorse jockey brakes his back twice, what can one do and what should one do? This page offers help.

The header picture shows the old L5 pars fracture on the right. The gap you see isn’t a vacuum but a connection known as a soft callus; cartilage and fibrous tissue exist in the fracture gap between the broken fragments. The recent pars interarticularis fracture on the left also occurred at the L5 vertebra, the brightness confirms the inflammatory stage to be active when the scan was made. Imagine both left and right rein breaking at the bridle… where does that leave the horse’ head. Potentially out of control, so you can understand the jockey’s concern. It is called spondylolysis which is commonly the result of axial (vertical direction) loading of a spine in extension (bending backwards). It is a common fracture in adolescent gymnasts, in bowling cricketers and may occur in jockeys who become unseated. The jockey saw two Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeons and got two differing opinions.

Surgery

The first Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon recommended internal fixation of the fracture. Placing a screw directly across the fracture site(s) and using bone morphogenic protein – a synthetic protein that induces the patient’s own stem cells to turn into bone healing cells – to speed up the healing process and increases success rate of fusion. Surgical repair typically takes about 3-6 months to unite but it may take longer. The young jockey neither had significant degenerative disc disease nor a significant slip of one vertebra on the other, hence was a good candidate for fracture repair. But some adults with bilateral pars fractures don’t develop lower back symptoms in their lifetime, many adults with bilateral pars fractures will develop degenerative disc disease and/or a slip of one vertebra on the other (isthmic spondylolysthesis). The thing is, so do people who have never fractured their spine or have ridden Thoroughbreds at any speed… A young daughter of friends of ours had titanium screws-rods fitted to correct her scoliosis. Her Consultant confirmed that her transpedicular fixation had broken – by doing yoga of all things – and she now faces revision surgery. Fortunately the jockey’s pars fractures would only need screw implants.

Conservative Approach

The second Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon advised a conservative approach. This is what unintentionally occurred after the undetected fracture on the right side. The fact that you see a gap, known as a soft callus, means that this didn’t go well: cartilage and fibrous tissue exist in the fracture gap between the broken fragments that prevented healing. It is not bone hard. My suggestion is that conservative treatment should consist of concerted efforts to encourage a hard callus to form. The advice given in this web page aims to help with what to do when a racehorse jockey breaks his back.

Fracture Repair

In order for a fracture to knit back together 1) the two pieces must remain close enough together to be able to fuse, 2) minimal movement at fracture site encourages the formation of a hard callus (e.g. low-magnitude high-frequency vibration), 3) tissue pH, tissue oxygenation and micronutrient levels should be such to encourage/fuel healing. Fracture repair happens in three phases.

  • The inflammation phase is the first stage: fracture > a blood clot forms which brings inflammatory cells to the wound area > a cytokine cascade brings repair cells into the fracture gap > these cells immediately begin to differentiate into specialized cells that build new bone tissue (osteoblasts) and new cartilage (chondroblasts). Over the next few months, these cells begin the repair process, laying down new bone matrix and cartilage. At this initial stage, osteoclast cells dissolve and recycle bone debris.
  • The reparative stage is the second stage. Two weeks after fracture > proteins produced by osteoblasts and chondroblasts consolidate into a primary soft callus > in the presence (!) of micronutrients this hardens into a hard callus over a 6 to 12 week period.
  • The remodeling phase is the third stage: the callus begins to mature and remodel itself. Woven bone is remodeled into stronger lamellar bone by the orchestrated action of both osteoblast bone formation cells and osteoclast bone resorption cells.

Later into the reparative stage, gentle and strictly isometric muscle setting exercises help low-magnitude vibration over the fracture site. Note that the tissue formed (hard or soft callus) is determined by the microenvironment: high oxygen concentration and mechanical stability favours bone formation whereas low oxygen and instability leads to formation of cartilage. During the inflammation phase, when you are immobilised, you cannot boost tissue pO2 by fitness but you can boost it with daily alkaline clever smoothies in which sulphur-rich proteins (such as those found in fermented diary products) increase oxygenation of the body: add 3-6 tbsp flaxseed oil and 4 oz. (1/2 cup) cottage cheese or natural yogurt or 125ml milk kefir in the 1.6 pint (32 fl oz) Nutribullet smoothie. A ketogenic diet will increase your lung oxygen intake levels per minute as will Buyeko breathing.

More nutrients, better healing

Inflammation is a very necessary phase but too much inflammation hinders healing. Nutrients such as vitamin C, bioflavonoids, flavonols (e.g. Quercitin and Proanthrocydins) and omega-3 fatty acids moderate the inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes COX-1 and COX-2.

A 2006 Swedish hip fracture study found fracture patients given complex multi-nutrient supplementation containing protein, carbohydrates, amino acids, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, trace minerals, and lipid soluble vitamins, had only a 15% rate of complications as compared to a 70% complications rate among the non-supplemented group. A Swedish meta-analysis of 17 such clinical hip fracture trials which reported that oral multi-nutrient supplementation (including nutrients such as carbohydrates, protein, arginine, zinc, and antioxidants) reduced deaths and complications from hip fracture by nearly 50%. A placebo controlled, multi-nutrient study from India administered vitamin C, Lysine, Proline, and vitamin B6 to tibial fracture patients. In those receiving multi-nutrient therapy, fracture healing time was reduced by approximately two weeks, with a larger percentage healing in 10 weeks (33%) as compared to the 11% in the placebo group. As an aside, aloe vera contains 20 of the 22 necessary and 7 of the 8 essential amino acids next to raft of other nutrients, hence why research found aloe vera to be helpful in fracture healing.

A lesser known nutrient for bone health and repair is Boron (we obtain it from food primarily as boric acid H3BO3 which is naturally present in chickpeas, almonds, beans, vegetables, bananas, walnuts, avocado, broccoli, prunes, oranges, red grapes, apples, raisins, pears, and many other beans and legumes). Another such nutrient is inorganic Silica (best food sources for Silica again come from unrefined food, notably Equisetum arvense, but who puts leaves and stems of common horsetail in their smoothies… In April 2015 a report by Britain’s Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies again highlighted the rise in rickets, a disease that many people would have assumed died out in Victorian times, with one quarter of infants –more in some areas– deficient in vitamin D. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, fractures can be reduced by 25%-50% via improving serum vitamin D levels. Magnesium, in particular, pays bone-health dividends by suppressing parathyroid hormone release and thus decreasing osteoclast activity. Vitamin K2 (MK-7) is a ‘Calcium chaperone’ and activates the protein osteocalcin which enables it to shunt Calcium out of circulation and into the bone, where it strengthens the collagen-mineral matrix.

Bone stress reaction i.e. diagnosis with lumbar stress fractures is prevalent among cricket fast bowlers. From research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, it is interesting to note that there is no consistency in the relationship between pain and CT scan results. Which is why this jockey’s first pars fracture remained unnoticed until the recent scan. CT scans do not provide objective evidence for ongoing management or decision concerning return to sport in fast bowlers (cricket), nor does it in racehorse jockeys. Taking 1 Aloeride vegicapsule 2-3x a day provides support for the skeletal system as well as for the greater uptake of nutrients from your diet.

Force versus Strength

As you know, the definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different outcome. The thin ice with a conservative approach is that no comprehensive guidance may have been given to the patient about prevention. ‘See how you get on’ doesn’t cut it. A conservative approach should embrace 1) improving/maintaining mobility i.e. how movement is distributed throughout the spine so as not to get abnormal focal loading and 2) improving/maintaining bone density i.e. all of the above in respect of building bone that is as strong as can be and 3) improving/maintaining core stability, so that’s training. A pars fracture of course may be caused by ordinary misadventure, based on a practice with 5,600 patients however, I know that diet in youngsters may not give a spine all it needs to stand up to force. The greater your innate strength, the better you can cope with force.

Improving mobility

In a L5 pars fracture, after it has healed, you want to avoid overloading L5 and its L5-S1 joint level. This means that you want the spine above L5 to shoulder its proper share of mobility within the kinetic chain. The same goes for below L5 i.e. hip mobility, that is, the joint itself as well as the iliopsoas and hamstrings muscles. If there is any early morning stiffness then this may be overcome by dietary changes (all of the above) plus cardio-respiratory workouts. Your efforts to mobilise soft tissue will be more effective once early morning stiffness is sorted. The safest way to minimise L5/L5-S1 overload is with electro-acupuncture to visible contractions for a minimum of 20 minutes per treatment (apophyseal joint level L2/L3 – Bl23 Shenshu and apophyseal joint level L4/L5 – Bl25 Dachangshu; if you want to avoid L5 then use L2/3 and L3/4). Electro-acupuncture (pre)mobilisations must be followed immediately by active (mobilising) movement through the newly gained range. The most appropriate ones are those yoga exercises that allow you total control. Beyond that, osteopathic or gentle chiropractic mobilisations (not using L5 spinous process as a lever) may be possible later on when complete fracture healing is secured.

Improving strength

Ultimately the range passive of range of movement must be covered by active movement, so you will have muscle control at every stage. Back lifts from a position of semi-lumbar flexion is safe to start with. Low crunches with your heels nearly touching your buttocks is safe to start with. Side plank on elbows is safe to start with. Rotation against resistance definitely is not good to start with because it uses the spinous processes as a lever. Chartered Physiotherapists with a keen interest in and knowledge of sporting injuries will know more exercises than you can shake a stick at.

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Try reverse to make your horse go forward…

Aloeride aloe vera steamed soaked rolled oats
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A very dear friend of mine used to keep me on my toes with quotes like “il faut reculer pour mieux sauter”. Literally this means that one must draw back in order to make a better jump. Figuratively it could mean that you go back to older ways to get better results. Try reverse to make your horse go forward… be surprised at how much there is to gain.

Walk into your feed merchant and marvel at the vast array of horse feeds available. Imagine what was available to your grandparents and great-grandparents. Ask yourself if any of this proliferation has resulted in fewer gastric ulcerations/year, in fewer colics/year, in fewer cases of laminitis/year, in higher speeds at the racecourse, in higher jumps at showjumping… Galloping along in our busy lives, we assume that new is better, that ‘researched’ new is better still. But who is the winner? Is it your horse, is it you or is it follow the money, that catchphrase popularized by the 1976 drama-documentary motion picture All The President’s Men. Sure, you’re a winner in as much that scoops of feed save you time… If horses were the winner, the Royal Veterinary College of Surgeons statistics would show that interventions/year decreased because feed is getting smarter at preventing stuff.  That’s not the case.

You

Walk into your supermarket and marvel at the vast array of foods available… again, spoilt for choice and being advertised to, to an inch of your life. When you are not doing well on modern food and present with symptoms, consider reverting back to a simpler diet like a Paleolithic diet. You limit foods that became common when farming emerged about 10,000 years ago i.e. dairy products, grains (wheat, oats, barley), refined sugar, table salt, potatoes and legumes (beans, lentils, peanuts, peas). You include lean grass-fed meat or wild game, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and oils from fruit and nuts (olive oil or walnut oil). It may be a nightmare diet for vegetarians or vegans but, for health-challenged omnivores, a test period of simplifying food intake can reveal huge benefits. It is a sustainable diet providing the emphasis is not on the meat/fish quantity and, for better results still, add the clever smoothies that we advocate. When you are not doing well on modern food and present with symptoms, you also have the luxury of choice to do or not do Intermittent Fasting. Not so for your horse because its continuous gastric secretion prohibits any fasting.

Your Horse

When your horse is not doing well on modern feed, revert back to oats (Avena sativa). Simplify your horse’s diet by abandoning compound, cooked feeds. It is safe to do so, two generations ago this was the norm. Manufacturers of compound feeds unfairly associated oats with excessive excitability, equine rhabdomyolysis syndrome (ERS), colic and laminitis. Such criticism ignores that traditionally oats were fed alongside good quality hay, haylage, grass or alfalfa. Given the array of calmers sold annually, it is a fair observation that compound feeds do not prevent horses going fizzy… nor do compound feeds prevent experiencing colic, nor do compound feeds prevent developing laminitis. As my dear friend would say “plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” (the more it changes, the more it’s the same thing). Oats have the highest fibre content and lowest energy of all the grains. Their grains are easy to chew properly thus mixing with saliva well. Sure, compared to compound cooked feeds, the shelf life of oats is not ideal when galloping along in our busy lives (we know, looking after horses is hard work) but, is not your horse worth a trial?

Digestive issues

I wrote this article because at Aloeride we receive many questions about horses that struggle with their digestion. During such calls we may discuss the timeline i.e. symptoms, intervention, response, change of feed, supplements and so on. Often one compound feed was swapped for another to little avail. Imagine feed-sensitivity and trigger A being in feed 1 and trigger B being in feed 2. Swapping from feed 1 to 2 would make no apparent difference to your horse. Desensitisation (Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy) is costly and not always successful. Hence the advice ‘Try reverse to make your horse go forward’, take diet back to basics and observe. If there is a clear improvement, then you have it confirmed on a shoestring that there is a food trigger. Then a choice is to be made in respect of future feed and – like in human food sensitivity – adding Aloeride provides a very useful digestive support via a wide range of nutrients.

Oat Couture

Pure oats are considered safe for those with gluten intolerance, a surprising angle perhaps until you hear vets talk about horses with IBS. Raw, whole oats have a 2.3-8.5% beta-glucan content which reduces the risk of Obesity and type 2 Diabetes. Both horses and people can get Insulin Resistance, but horses do not go to the next step of Diabetes 2. As you know, horses do have total carbohydrate load issues (hence low cal, low GI, laminitic and super cool feeds). Beta-glucan increases the excretion of bile acids (good detox) and binds with cholesterol-rich bile acids. Normally, bile acids are re-absorbed in the digestive system, but beta-glucan inhibits this recycling process thereby seeing bad cholesterol (LDL) out of the horse. Beta-glucan also causes a reduction in blood sugar and insulin levels after a carbohydrate-rich meal (thus less spiking). The major protein in oats is called Avenalin (80%) – not found in any other grain – which is similar to legume proteins, a minor protein (i.e. not much of it) is called Avenin which is related to gluten in wheat. Raw oats are the only dietary source of powerful antioxidants called Avenathramides and these have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-itch, anti-irritant, and anti-atherogenic activities. Raw oats are high in many vitamins and minerals: Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Copper, Zinc, Iron, Selenium, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin E (total tocols ranged from 19 to 30.3 mg/kg; α-tocotrienol & α-tocopherols combined account for 86 to 91%). In human patients with type 2 Diabetes and severe Insulin Resistance, a 4-week dietary intervention with oatmeal resulted in a 40% reduction in the insulin dosage needed for stabilizing blood sugar levels. When your horse is not doing well on modern feed, why not do a raw oats trial with your horse for 4 weeks with a gradual entry into a (soaked) oats + good quality hay/haylage, grass or alfalfa diet. You may discover that this is one of the ‘old ways’ that may have the edge over ‘new ways’.

Feed values of oats and dehulled oatsIn a transition from modern feeds to one of oats (with grazing/hay or haylage/Aloeride), you need to remember that scoops give volume i.e. measure litres or quarts. An equine stomach is relatively small – made for ongoing grazing with small amounts going in as small amounts pass to the duodenum – so supplemental meal size should be limited to no more than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) for an 1,100 lbs (500 kg) horse. A horse assumedly going hot on oats may happen for no simpler reason that the scoop feeds more oats than the feedroom scale would issue. As a reasonable starch intake per meal is 1g per 1kg of live weight, a 500g horse should get 0.5kg of starch per meal which equates to 1.1kg of oats (calculating on starch content being some 460g/kg DM = 46% x 1.1kg = 0.5kg of starch). Feeding should mirror workload and not all oats have the same nutritional value. So, as always, observe how your horse responds.

By weight, raw oats are 66% carbohydrates, 17% protein, 7% fat (unsaturated fatty acids) and 11% fiber. Oats contain more soluble fiber than other grains, leading to slower digestion, increased satiety and suppression of appetite. Oats are very low in sugar, with only 1% coming from sucrose. The starches in oats are different than those in other grains, it has a higher fat content and higher viscosity (it binds water better):

  • Rapidly digested starch (7%) which is quickly broken down and absorbed as glucose
  • Slowly digested starch (22%) that is broken down and absorbed more slowly
  • Resistant starch (25%) which functions like a type of fiber. It escapes digestion and improves gut health by feeding the friendly gut bacteria i.e. prebiotic

 

Many compound feeds contain wheat, barley and/or rye, all three contain gluten. When your horse is not doing well on modern feed it may well be reactive akin to non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. Rather than swap one compound feed for another compound feed via the trial and error method, why don’t you eliminate triggers by feeding your horse the traditional single feed. Take note of the following:

“Gluten may not be the culprit when it comes to wheat sensitivities, according to a new body of research presented at the United European Gastroenterology Week 2016. Instead, a team of scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany discovered a different protein in wheat known as amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) may be what triggers the stomach-sickening inflammation and other symptoms.”

“For the study, the team stopped focusing on gluten — a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye — and shifted their attention to ATIs because it appears to cause inflammation and worsen other chronic health conditions. Although ATIs only make up 4 percent of proteins found in wheat, they are responsible for a lot of damage throughout the body. Not only is the stomach at risk for dangerous inflammation, but so are the lymph nodes, kidneys, spleen, and brain as well. ATIs may also contribute to the development of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.”

To soak or not to soak

Soak whole oats in cold water for approximately 12 hours. A benefit is that dust will be and chemical residue from sprays may be washed away. It may make oats softer but frankly, the huge molars of a horse will masticate unsoaked whole oats perfectly fine (toothless veterans being the exception). During the transition period you may noticed a few oats in your horse’ droppings, but only for about a week.

“If 9kg oats and 3.5kg hay are fed then the likely fat intakes will be between 490 and 525 g/day, up to 1.5x that consumed from forage alone (312 to 437 g/day from 12.5kg dry material say grass hay). If naked (hull-less) oats are substituted for traditional oats then the fat intake from the basic ration would nearly be 1 kg/day. Thus, horses fed conventional diets can consume between half and one kilo of plant fat per day, all of it unsaturated! It is clear that the horse is well adapted to dietary fat when it is a component of plant material.” Dr. Derek Cuddeford (RIP), Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh

Does soaking make oats a ‘living enzyme’

Most of the metabolically active proteins, mostly enzymes, in oats are in the water-soluble albumin fraction. Among the enzymes, presence of proteases, maltase, a-amylase, lichenase, phenoxyacetic acid hydroxylase, phosphatase, tyrosinase, and lipases have been reported (Osborne classification). Some suggest that oats during soaking start to self-digest and, having been ‘pre-digested’ overnight, require fewer digestive enzyme resources from a horse. Well, if you sprinkle an enzyme complex (amylase, protease, lipase) on porridge you will see its consistency change within 15 minutes… porridge goes fluidy/slimy. The surface of oats does not appear surface slimy by overnight self-digestion (i.e. it is softer because of being wetted only). If you must soak oats then drain them overnight or for a good hour prior to feeding. BTW the water in the soaking bin will contain some of the inorganic minerals from the oats. Why soak if not absolutely necessary?!? In light work feed approximately 2lbs – 3lbs of oats twice a day with alfalfa and good hay. In hard work e.g. eventing or racing feed approximately 6lbs – 7lbs of oats twice a day with alfalfa and good hay. As always with any feed, observe how your horse responds.

Scientific information on oats: Journal Food Science Technology.

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10 Things To Remember When Feeding Your Competition Horse

Aloeride aloe vera eventing Victoria-Bax
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Feeding your horse the right amount and the right type of fuel can make the difference between a lack lustre performance in the arena or fireworks under saddle. Here are our top tips to remember when feeding your competition horse:

  1. Keep an eye on his weight. Using a weight tape allows you to monitor his weight more effectively than just by the naked eye. Increasing your horses’ workload and traveling can take their toll on his weight so make sure you feed accordingly to his work load and temperament.
  2. Remember forage is vital for a healthy digestive system. If you are spending your days on the road and competing, make sure your horse is still getting enough roughage.
  3. Get expert nutritionist advice to help get the best out of your horses performance by feeding the right type for temperament and level of work.
  4. Water is essential for horses and if your horse Is working hard, he’ll need to replace water lost through sweating. Make sure you supply fresh, clean water at all times and electrolytes if necessary.
  5. Health and vitality come from the inside and show on the outside, so feed the best quality feed and ensure that your feed barn is kept clean and feed is stored in a rodent proof container. Regularly clean feed bowls and utensils.
  6. Competition days are bound to mean a change of routine where feed is concerned, so ensure that your horse has plenty of roughage to support a healthy hindgut.
  7. If you are out for the day, waiting to feed your horse his evening feed, even if a little time later than his usual routine should be fine alongside water and forage.
  8. If you are planning a longer trip or to stay away at a competition venue, make sure you have enough feed and hay with you for the duration and then add in some extra, just in case your stay is longer.
  9. Feed Aloeride. Aloeride is natural organic aloe vera which has wide reaching health benefits for your horse. From supporting healthy digestion, skin, coat and hooves in one easy to feed daily taste-free supplement.
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The Magic Of Aloe Vera Is Not In Its Water

The magic of aloe vera is not in the water
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Let me explain why the magic of aloe vera is not in its water. When anybody tells you that aloe vera gel (aloe vera juice) is ‘best’ because ‘it is more natural’ or ‘it contains its natural medium’ then remember this: Nature uses water to move stuff from A to B. That is why your body as a whole contains some 60% water, your brain 70%, your blood 83%, your lungs 90% and that is why aloe vera contains 95% water… so it can move its nutrients about and doesn’t run dry during droughts (after all this is genetically a desert plant).

Nature’s biochemistry works because of the transported stuff and not because of the water. So when it comes to aloe vera, you can get water perfectly fine from your tap water (we think it’s better when you filter it). What you seek is that what fuels the magic, and this is what laboratories measure in abundance inside Aloeride… high levels of working molecules. We freeze the water out which means that heat-sensitive molecules within whole leaf aloe vera barbadensis miller remain intact (note that Aloeride gives you the water-soluble nutrients via the inner gel as well as the lipid-soluble nutrients from the rind).

We assume that you too prefer ‘fact via objective measurement’ over ’emotive marketing’. For what’s the point jubilating about a carton of twelve eggs when in reality it contains only six… or in some cases even less. You see, what aloe vera gel enthusiasts may not know is that independent laboratories time and again measure that Aloeride aloe vera contains very significantly more of the molecules that are responsible for the accolades attributed to aloe vera. By taking the water out responsibly, we are able to put loads more working molecules in a vegetarian capsule or in a sachet, of course this also prevents bacterial degradation so we don’t have to use (and you can’t react adversely to) stabilisers.

Aloeride gives you those 5% working (incl. beta-linked polysaccharide) molecules because they work the magic, notably the orchestration of the other molecules. Aloe’s 95% water is just the medium that enables movement from A to B (true within soil, within any plant, within any mammal outside its cells). Water is not what aloe vera’s many accolades are based upon, otherwise water would have received that same praise. That’s deliriously simple isn’t it.

For fullness of information, certain water is  magical.  Inside healthy body cells  (yours and those of your horse), water models itself with protein carboxylate groups into low-density clathrate structures. However, in order to achieve this, a strong potassium bias and ample adenosine triphosphate is necessary. The point is, water inside aloe vera does not contribute to your clathrate structuring, but eating loads of (raw) vegetables and certain fruits does (daily turn out on large, varying pasture for your horse), reducing the amount of sugar you ingest does, reducing the amount of sodium you ingest does… So, talk about aloe vera ‘original medium’ (aloe vera water) alludes to the magic properties of water that it possesses INSIDE healthy body cells. It’s the marketing talk of smoke and mirrors. The magic of aloe vera is not in its water…